Program-level

Privacy Literacy Toolkit for K-20 librarians and educators to facilitate creation of learning experiences on privacy related topics.  Toolkit includes teaching materials, how-tos, case studies, current awareness resources, along with professional values & policy guidance.
Contributor: Alexandria Chisholm
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has Value
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This workshop is one of three in the Privacy Workshop Series at Penn State Berks.  Our series focuses on privacy issues for students in the past, present, and future.  Digital Shred deals with evaluating and shredding past digital behaviors, the Privacy Workshop focuses on privacy practices/concerns in the current moment, and Digital Leadership speaks to future implications of digital practices.In the Digital Shred Workshop, students will be able to:Reflect on and describe their digital privacy priorities in order to articulate the benefits and risks of their digital dossierApply a growth mindset to critically examine their current data exhaust // digital footprint and recognize when change is neededDevelop a Personal Data Integrity Plan that makes routine the process of auditing and updating their digital dossier in alignment with their privacy valuesDescribe “digital shred” and its importance. 
Contributor: Alexandria Chisholm
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has Value
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This is a recorded webcast presentation featuring tips on using the MLA International Bibliography to teach scholarly research concepts and analytical skills.
Contributor: Angela Ecklund
Resource Type(s): Conference Presentation
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as ConversationSearching as Strategic Exploration
Type of Institution: CollegeUniversity
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
The MLA provides short tutorial videos that help users make the most of the bibliography’s rich metadata and its advanced searching and filtering features. New and updated tutorials are released throughout the year.If you have a suggestion for a topic that you would like to see covered in a tutorial, please let us know by sending an e-mail to bibliography@mla.org.
Contributor: Angela Ecklund
Resource Type(s): Tutorial
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Searching as Strategic Exploration
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
The MLA has developed an online course to teach students how to use the MLA International Bibliography for college-level research. Each of the five units in the course presents a lesson, followed by progression questions to reinforce the lesson through active engagement with the bibliography, and a quiz.  Students will receive a badge upon passing each quiz and a course-completion badge after completing all the lessons and passing all five quizzes.The course usually takes students ninety minutes or less to complete and requires that they have access to the MLA International Bibliography on the EBSCO platform through their institution’s library. Students can create a free account to take the course and start earning badges.In January 2018, the MLA launched four new subject area modules to accompany its online course Understanding the MLA International Bibliography. Each module focuses on searching the bibliography for scholarly publications in one of four disciplines: folklore, linguistics, film (including television, video, and other broadcast media), and rhetoric and composition. Students who complete the new modules can earn badges in each of these four subject areas. Visit the course site to access the main course and new modules.Interested in other resources for teaching research and information literacy? Visit the Teaching Resources page on The MLA Style Center, where you’ll find lesson plans, assignments, and an instructor’s guide to integrating the online course into class curricula.
Contributor: Angela Ecklund
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Searching as Strategic Exploration
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
If there were a list of things I absolutely required all my students to understand before leaving my class, the relationship between mass media, politics, and science would be close to the top of the list. But there are a lot of moving parts in these relationships, so the terrain is difficult to traverse.  As one might expect of a difficult topic, there is much to read and a lot to unpack.   This pathfinder discusses how politics and our mass media system complicate the dissemination of important scientific information. 
Contributor: Todd Heldt
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
Studying music in an online setting requires that students and instructors leverage digital resources and participatory technologies with understanding and intentionality. Meta-literacy, a framework promoting critical thinking and collaboration, is an inclusive approach to understanding the complexities of information use, production, and sharing in a digital environment. This chapter explores the implications of meta-literacy for the online music classroom and identifies ways in which the librarian and music instructor can collaborate to promote student self-reflection on the use, creation, and understanding of musical information or content.  
Contributor: Rachel Scott
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
In this exploratory study the author asks students enrolled in a credit-bearing undergraduate research methods course to rank and evaluate the troublesome, transformative, and integrative nature of the six frames currently comprising the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. The results indicate that students have valid insights into threshold concept-based instruction, but may confuse the application with the theory. If practitioners are to embrace not only the frames, but also the spirit of the Framework, we must directly involve students in our teaching and research practices.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License CC-BY-NC-ND
This workshop delivers an action-oriented introduction to personal data privacy designed for new college students. The session is designed to reveal the systems in place to collect and analyze online behavioral data, and to unveil the real-world consequences of online profiling in contexts like sentiment shaping, consumer preferences, employment, healthcare, personal finance, and law enforcement. In lieu of a prescriptive approach, students analyze case studies to observe how online behaviors impact real-world opportunities and reflect on the benefits and risks of technology use to develop purposeful online behaviors and habits that align with their individual values. Developing knowledge practices regarding privacy and the commodification of personal information and embodying the core library values of privacy and intellectual freedom, the workshop promotes a proactive rather than reactive approach and presents a spectrum of privacy preferences across a range of contexts in order to respect students’ autonomy and agency in personal technology use.
Contributor: Alexandria Chisholm
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has Value
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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