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The goal of this activity is to help students develop a broader understanding how authority is determined and what types of sources are considered appropriate in different contexts. It is also intended to help address some of the misconceptions that students have related to the source evaluation process. 
Contributor: Jane Hammons
Resource Type(s): Activity
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
This web resource provides a brief overview of the concept Authority is Constructed and Contextual. It includes a video, a concept description, and the related knowledge practices and dispositions. 
Contributor: Jane Hammons
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
The goal of this activity is to help students start to think critically about the evaluation strategies that they have learned and whether they support the effective evaluation of information. Students will learn about the lateral reading strategy for evaluation and compare it to their existing evaluation process. 
Contributor: Jane Hammons
Resource Type(s): Activity
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
This workshop engages participants in exploring corporate data collection, personal profiling, deceptive design, and data brokerage practices. Workshop content is contextualized with the theoretical frameworks of panoptic sort (Gandy), surveillance capitalism (Zuboff), and the four regulators (Lessig) and presented through a privacy and business ethics lens. Participants will learn how companies make money from data collection practices; explore how interface design can influence our choices and behaviors; and discuss business ethics regarding privacy and big data.The workshop is designed for...
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as Process, Information Has Value
The goal of this activity is to help students develop a broader understanding of the purpose of academic research assignments, by helping to identify some of the common misconceptions that they might have about research assignments. This could also be used as a low-stakes activity or assignment at the beginning of a research project to help clarify expectations.
Contributor: Jane Hammons
Resource Type(s): Activity
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as Inquiry
The goal of this activity is to help students start to develop an understanding of research as an ongoing process of inquiry, rather than a straightforward process of compiling information on a topic. Students develop initial definitions of “research as inquiry,” review and discuss resources related to the concept, revise their definitions, and reflect on how the concept relates to their research practices.  
Contributor: Jane Hammons
Resource Type(s): Activity
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as Inquiry
Comprehensive strategies on finding statistics and data.
Contributor: Grace Liu
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Searching as Strategic Exploration
20-30 minute activity for students to practice citing material in a specific citation style. Can be adapted for any style.
Contributor: Justina Elmore
Resource Type(s): Activity
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has Value
Set in a broader internship program as a key component of an archival program and following a backwards design approach, interns (undergraduate students) develop complimentary archival exhibits in both physical and digital environments. Students are also tasked with anticipating their information needs. The supervisor draws on the Scholarship as Conversation Frame of the ACRL Framework to encourage conceptualizing both the archives/special collections/library environment they are in as a place of active conversation, and as a basis for encouraging reflection on the information component of...
Contributor: Hanz Olson
Resource Type(s): Other
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as Conversation
This is a fun, hands-on activity that can help with brainstorming a topic and/or reserach question. Can also function as an ice-breaker! The results can be informative...and also sometimes entertaining!On the slip of paper (attachment), students write their name and a Population that they'd like to focus on. then they hand it off to another student, who fills in a Place. They then hand it off to a third student, who fills in a Problem. Finally, the slip is returned to its original owner who must formulate a research question based on those three pieces of information. 
Contributor: Sarah Hood
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as Inquiry

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