Other

The C.R.E.A.T.E.S. website

Created in collaboration with Jordan Moberg Parker, UCLA's Director of Undergraduate Laboratory Curriculum and Assessment in Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, C.R.E.A.T.E.S. is a set of 6 steps that help learners read and critically analyze scientific papers. The C.R.E.A.T.E.S. method, pioneered by Dr. Sally Hoskins, has a demonstrated positive impact on undergraduate students' self-confidence in scientific reading, as well as in their general perceptions of and beliefs about science and scientific thinking (Hoskins, et. al, 2017).The new C.R.E.A.T.E.S. site uses interactive media, step-by-step directions, and detailed annotation of authentic examples to guide students through the process.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

First Year Experience Business Information Literacy Instruction Lesson Plan and Presentation Slides

This is a lesson plan for FYE business IL session. The plan incorporated a role play active learning activity and framework concept information has value.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Type of Institution:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution License CC-BY

Digital Shred Privacy Literacy Toolkit

Privacy Literacy Toolkit for K-20 librarians and educators to facilitate creation of learning experiences on privacy related topics.  Toolkit includes teaching materials, how-tos, case studies, current awareness resources, along with professional values & policy guidance.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
All Rights Reserved

Information Literacy & Student Learning Outcomes Infographics

As part of the Information Literacy Initiative at the University of North Texas, a team of librarians conducted a curriculum mapping project to improve UNT students’ critical thinking and ability to use information effectively. Their project aimed to help enhance core library services with high-impact practices. They mapped student learning outcomes to know which core courses addressed components of the AAC&U Information Literacy VALUE Rubric and ACRL Framework as well as identify gaps in library instruction. Their intent is that other librarians would address these gaps through strategically targeted library instruction. The handout and poster provided are infographics that they use to communicate the curriculum mapping results to their faculty. Created in Piktochart, the graphics may be used as design inspiration for others to communicate the results of their curriculum mapping projects.

Resource Type(s):

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific

Type of Institution:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Scholarly Inquiry and Research Methods (live or online course)

This undergraduate course, offered either live or online, combines the concepts of scholarship and information literacy in a set of five modules with instructions, guided tasks and assignments.  The course lies within an adult education Bachelor of Arts in Leadership (Trinity Western University).

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Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Interdisciplinary

Type of Institution:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA

Meta-literacy in the online music classroom: Opportunities for instructor and librarian collaboration

Studying music in an online setting requires that students and instructors leverage digital resources and participatory technologies with understanding and intentionality. Meta-literacy, a framework promoting critical thinking and collaboration, is an inclusive approach to understanding the complexities of information use, production, and sharing in a digital environment. This chapter explores the implications of meta-literacy for the online music classroom and identifies ways in which the librarian and music instructor can collaborate to promote student self-reflection on the use, creation, and understanding of musical information or content.  
License Assigned: 
All Rights Reserved

Accommodating Faculty Requests and Staying True to Your Pedagogical Ideals in the 1-Shot Information Literacy Session

Librarians are frequently asked to “teach” several databases in a 1-shot session, despite findings suggesting that such database demonstrations do not lead to optimal student outcomes. The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education highlights the concepts of metaliteracy and metacognition. This paper investigates ways in which I leveraged both of these concepts to reconcile my pedagogical ideals with an attempt to honor a faculty member’s request. By demonstrating question posing and making my own metacognitive processes transparent to students, I found that I could honor a faculty request for specific database demonstration while helping learners comprehend and see beyond the constructs of platform and format.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
MultidisciplinaryMusic
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License CC-BY-NC-ND

Information Literacy Framework Course Planning Template

This template gives space to outline an Information Literacy session, allowing a department to create a more cohesive program, or a single librarian to maintain an organized sense of their own sessions.This single page template gives space for teaching and learning activities, applying a frame, tools used for the session, assesment techniques used, time taken, as well as assigning it to a course and instructor.
Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA

White Paper: University of North Texas, Information Fluency Initiative

Paper discussing a proposal for an information fluency initiative at the University of North Texas (UNT) Libraries.

Resource Type(s):

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific

Type of Institution:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA

How Information Works: ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Lay Language

I wrote "How Information Works:ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Lay Language" for a faculty workshop we held at Ohio University called, "Reimagining the Research Assignment."  Later, the Learner-Centered Teaching team took the "Actions" and/or "Attitudes" from that restatement and wrote "Gateway Scales:" almost-rubrics for each frame.  Our intention here is to greatly simplify the language so faculty can more easily understand our purpose. I have linked to our page, where several versions can be accessed: simple (b/w), color handout, long color version with attitudes and actions from novice to expert.  I have also uploaded PDFs of both documents.
Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

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