Information Creation as Process

Using Generative AI Responsibly for Brainstorming and Refining a Research Question

This activity involves using Generative AI platforms, such as ChatGPT, Claude, Gemini, and Pi.ai, to assist in brainstorming and refining research questions. Students will experiment with different prompts, and engage in a conversational approach with the AI to get the best, most useful results.This activity is intended to provide students with an introduction to effective GenAI prompt construction and does not explore the ethical issues of using this technology.  Estimated Time: ~1 hour, give/take 15 minThis activity is structured into three main sections:Narrowing a Topic:Experiment with different prompts to see which ones work best for narrowing down a research topic.Record the effective prompts and note whether a single interaction (single-shot) or multiple interactions (few-shot) were needed.List additional topic suggestions provided by the AI and evaluate their relevance.Refining Your Research Question:Test various prompts to refine a research question.Identify the most effective prompts and determine if a single-shot or few-shot approach was more beneficial.Document other research questions suggested by the AI and assess their usefulness.Generating Keywords/Phrases for Library Database Searches:Use prompts to generate keywords and phrases for searching in library databases.Note which prompts were most effective and whether a single-shot or few-shot approach was used.List additional keywords or phrases suggested by the AI and consider their applicability.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

ChatGPT Bookmark (English & Spanish)

Tips and Advice on using ChatGPT effectively and ethically (English & Spanish)
Discipline(s): 
Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Think Outside the Box (In-class Exercise)

Thinking Outside the Box is an in-class research exercise designed to facilitate students' evaluation of information found in subscription databases and obtained through generative artificial intelligence tools by providing a series of questions for them to answer. For this exercise, the applicable frames from the Framework for Information Literacy include: "authority is constructed and contextual," "information creation as process," and "searching as strategic exploration."

Resource Type(s):

Type of Institution:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Research Process Reflection Prompts

This resource consists of three prompts for students to reflect on their research process at the beginning, the midpoint, and the end of a research assignment. The reflection responses can be used by librarians and instructors to identify where students are struggling in the research process and use that information to improve their teaching. 
Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Introduction of Lateral Reading for Media Literacy

This lesson plan introduces students to lateral reading techniques using the SIFT method. Designed and implemented for a political science introduction to international relations course, this can easily be adapted to other media literacy contexts. Students will practice lateral reading with sample news articles. Worksheets, slides, and sample articles are linked in the lesson plan. Alternative news articles can be substituted.

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License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Using ChatGPT For Library Instruction: Information Creation as a Process

ChatGPT is an generative artificial intelligence chatbot released in November 2022 by OpenAI. What are the opportunities in using this tool to teach library instruction? This document highlights various ways to engage with learners in critically analyzing ChatGPT (version GPT-3) and its responses through the ACRL Frame: Information Creation as a Process. 

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Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
All Rights Reserved

Scholarship is Not Neutral: Using Positionality Statements for Source Evaluation

Beginning college students often make assumptions that scholarly sources are inherently bias-free. Students may also hold the belief that if they find a source through a library database, it is automatically a useful and neutral viewpoint on a topic. These mindsets can limit students’ motivation to apply evaluation strategies beyond establishing credibility based on the author’s credentials.This lesson plan introduces the concept of positionality statements to help students understand that scholars do not leave their identities and life experiences behind when they conduct research. Students practice a new way to evaluate and understand the perspective–and limitations–that scholars bring to their research.The lesson plan is designed for first-year composition courses in which students are asked to develop a research topic based on their interests or experiences. It could be adapted for upper-level undergraduate courses in the social sciences.

Resource Type(s):

Discipline(s): 
EnglishMultidisciplinary
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Dark Patterns: Surveillance Capitalism and Business Ethics

This workshop engages participants in exploring corporate data collection, personal profiling, deceptive design, and data brokerage practices. Workshop content is contextualized with the theoretical frameworks of panoptic sort (Gandy), surveillance capitalism (Zuboff), and the four regulators (Lessig) and presented through a privacy and business ethics lens. Participants will learn how companies make money from data collection practices; explore how interface design can influence our choices and behaviors; and discuss business ethics regarding privacy and big data.The workshop is designed for 75-minute class sessions, but can be compressed into 60-minute sessions. Includes workshop guide, presentation slides, learning activities, and assessment instrument.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Data vs. Information vs. Knowledge

This is a good way to get students thinking about the conceptual differences between data, information and knowledge – which is an important first step to understanding how data, information and knowledge are created, disseminated and consumed. 

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Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

STEM Honors Citations and Bibliographies Class Activities

Learning Outcomes:Students will see best practices on citations for their poster session or honors paper, including key database and RaptorSearch examples.Students will receive a demonstration of the relationship between their reference list and their in-text citations.Students will see examples of how to better integrate citations into their writing, including examples of paraphrasing, summarizing, and incorporating multiple sources or switches among sources.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
BiologyMultidisciplinary
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

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