Not Discipline Specific

Background vs. Scholarly - What's the Difference?

This activity is designed to help students understand the difference between background sources and scholarly sources. Students will read a quick overview of the key differences between these source types, and then they will be asked to classify five sample sources. For each source, they will make an initial judgment based on a screenshot and then take a closer look at the full source to see if their gut instinct was correct. Correct answers and explanations are provided for each source.This activity is suitable for in-person, synchronous online, and asynchronous online instruction. It is self-paced and takes most students between 10 and 15 minutes to complete. The activity is hosted on Microsoft Sway, and it can be completed on a computer, tablet, phone, or any device with an internet connection.

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Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Understanding and Critiquing the Peer Review Process

Goal: The primary goal of the activity or assignment is for students to develop an increased understanding of the peer review process and how it is connected to the authority or credibility of different information sources. Students will also be encouraged to consider some of the criticisms that have been raised about the process and consider alternatives for determining authoritative sources within a field or discipline.Learning Outcomes:Explain the basic process of scholarly peer reviewExplore how the peer review process is used to identify or establish authoritative or credible works within a fieldCritically examine the peer review process, considering it in connection with issues such as access and bias

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Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Authority is Constructed and Contextual Infographic

This resource provides an overview of the concept Authority is Constructed and Contextual from the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. A brief overview of the concept is provided and several of the related knowledge practices and dispositions are highlighted. 

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Identifying Research Questions in a Discipline

The purpose of this activity is to help students identify the types of research questions that scholars in their field are investigating in preparation for developing their own research questions. As a class, students will review multiple scholarly articles related to a topic or question, identify the research question or questions, and then discuss the characteristics of research questions that are found in the field. 

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Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Multiple Format Research or Inquiry-Based Assignment

In this assignment, students will consider how the format of the information product can impact what they are able to convey related to a topic and how their information may be received and valued. Students will investigate a topic or question and share their response in multiple formats. Formats could range from a more traditional research paper or poster to blogs, infographic, video, or even a series of Tweets. Students will be required to consider how the format(s) they have selected might impact what they can or should share and how their message may be received.

Resource Type(s):

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Identifying Common Source Types in a Discipline

This activity is intended to help students understand the types of sources that are most commonly cited in research in a specific discipline or field. Students will review the citations from multiple relevant journal articles to identify the types of sources that are often cited. They will also be encouraged to consider why certain types of sources may be more cited than others, and what may be missing by relying primarily on certain types of sources. In addition, students will get practice in identifying the appropriate citation format for different types of sources.

Resource Type(s):

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Reflective Teaching Form

This Google Form can be used for you to track information about your instruction in one-shot and embedded information literacy sessions.  Reflecting upon your current instruction is a critical step in becoming a more effective information literacy instructor.  This form will allow you to track class information (e.g. professor, number of students, date of instruction, length of instruction), general feedback on the session (e.g. what worked well, what could have gone better), lesson planning details (e.g. which ACRL Frames were incorporated, what tools were used for assessment, when assessment was implemented), and findings from your assessment.  You can generate a Google Sheet to view all your entries, returning to past entries and reflections when you teach similar content or classes in the future to remember what aspects worked well and what you might want to change to have a more successful session.To use this form, create a copy to your Google Drive, which will allow you to tweak, add, or remove questions so that you can tailor the form for your own reflections on your teaching practice.  

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Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution License CC-BY

Using Altmetrics to Evaluate Pseudoscience News Media

These are the slides for the learning activity in the book chapter, "Teaching Undergraduates to Collate and Evaluate News Sources with Altmetrics" from the book Teaching About Fake News: Lesson Plans for Different Disciplines and Audiences. These slides include goals, definitions of original research, the scholarly conversation, altmetrics; and an in-class activity. 

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Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution License CC-BY

Disciplinary Enculturation - Theory and Practice

Many students in higher education, even in graduate school, begin as outsiders when they encounter disciplines related to their courses.  Their professors are the experts.  They are not.  The terminology, literature, and even cultures of these disciplines form barriers to participation.  Disciplinary enculturation is the process by which students become active participants within disciplines rather than outsiders trying to look over disciplinary walls.Disciplines need to be seen as "communities of practice"* rather than as repositories of knowledge.  As such, they have an agreed upon knowledge base (with variants), a culture (with variants), and a methodology (with variants).  Three terms label these elements of communities of practice: epistemology, metanarrative, and method. Disciplinary analysis is a first step for students entering into disciplinary communities as participants.  Beginning students must ask key questions that compel a discipline to explain itself, thus providing a path to enculturation.This is a guide to the theory and practice of disciplinary enculturation
Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific

Type of Institution:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA

#ForYou: Algorithms & the Attention Economy

By the end of the #ForYou: Algorithms & the Attention Economy workshop, students will be able to:describe recommender system algorithms in order to examine how they shape individuals' online experiences through personalizationanalyze their online behaviors and subsequent ad profiles in order to reflect on how they influence how individuals encounter, perceive, & evaluate information, leading to echo chambers & political polarizationassess how their data is used to personalize their online experience in order to build algorithmic awareness & make informed, intentional choices about their information consumption**This is a standalone workshop but also scaffolds from the Penn State Berks Privacy Workshop which gives students some foundational understanding of personal data collection practices.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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