Slide Deck

#ForYou: Algorithms & the Attention Economy

By the end of the #ForYou: Algorithms & the Attention Economy workshop, students will be able to:describe recommender system algorithms in order to examine how they shape individuals' online experiences through personalizationanalyze their online behaviors and subsequent ad profiles in order to reflect on how they influence how individuals encounter, perceive, & evaluate information, leading to echo chambers & political polarizationassess how their data is used to personalize their online experience in order to build algorithmic awareness & make informed, intentional choices about their information consumption

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CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Curiosity and Asking Questions

Slides from a lesson plan focused on developing curiosity and formulating questions. Students complete a curiosity self-assessment developed by librarians at Oregon State University, discuss what curiosity looks like in their academic and personal lives, and practice developing questions about essays they've read in class using the Question Formulation Technique. The lesson was inspired by this article: Rempel, Hannah Gascho, and Anne-Marie Deitering. "Sparking-curiosity—Librarians’ role in encouraging exploration." In the Library with the Lead Pipe (2017). 

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CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Battling Fake Science News: The Power of Framing

This is a Power Point presentation that goes with a chapter on how to address fake science news through the use of framing. 

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All Rights Reserved

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Privacy and Dx (Digital Transformation) Workshop [Peer/Professional]

This workshop engages academic librarians and higher education professionals in considering the implications of Dx (digital transformation) for privacy, especially intellectual privacy, in higher education. The session is designed to reveal how student, faculty, and staff data and metadata are collected, along with the potential implications of such data collection. Participants assess how this data is used in order to make informed, intentional choices to safeguard student and employee privacy. The session includes a guided close-reading activity to critically examine educational technology and productivity software privacy policies and terms of service. This workshop session scaffolds from the Intellectual Privacy Workshop [Peer/Professional] and Privacy Workshop [Peer/Professional].

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License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Intellectual Privacy Workshop [Peer/Professional]

This workshop introduces intellectual privacy and related concepts for academic librarians and higher education professionals. The session is designed to explore the interrelationship between intellectual privacy, surveillance, the chilling effect, open inquiry, and free expression. In lieu of a prescriptive approach, participants analyze readings, case studies, and the Social Cooling infographic to consider how surveillance within the academy and society at-large can impact inquiry and expression. Privacy, the chilling effect, FERPA, and the implications of data capture and surveillance in academic libraries and higher education are considered. Participants collaborate to develop considerations and principles for data use in academic libraries and higher education based on these concepts and case studies. This workshop session scaffolds from the Privacy Workshop [Peer/Professional] and is designed for synchronous or asynchronous delivery.

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License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Privacy Workshop [Peer/Professional]

This workshop delivers an action-oriented introduction to personal data privacy for academic librarians and higher education professionals. The session is designed to reveal the professional and educational technology systems in place to collect and analyze online behavioral data, and to unveil the real-world consequences of online profiling in contexts like academic integrity surveillance, student surveillance, and public health (COVID-19). In lieu of a prescriptive approach, participants analyze case studies to observe how online behaviors impact real-world opportunities and reflect on the benefits and risks of technology use to develop purposeful online behaviors and habits that align with their individual values. Developing knowledge practices regarding privacy and the commodification of personal information and embodying the core library values of privacy and intellectual freedom, the workshop promotes a proactive rather than reactive approach and presents a spectrum of privacy preferences across a range of contexts in order to respect participants’ autonomy and agency in personal technology use. Adapted from the student-facing Privacy Workshop.

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CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Revelatory Reading: Understanding, Critiquing and Unveiling Religious News Stories

These slides accompany the book chapter “Revelatory Reading: Understanding, Critiquing and Unveiling Religious News Stories” from Teaching About Fake News published by ACRL.

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Sound Science or Fake News? Evaluating and Interpreting Scientific Sources

These slides are designed to accompany Chapter 16: "Sound Science or Fake News?: Evaluating and Interpreting Scientific Sources Using the ACRL Framework" by Anna Mary Williford and Charlotte Ford, from the ACRL book Teaching About Fake News: Lesson Plans for Different Disciplines and Audiences.
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CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA

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Critically Evaluating Conspiracy Theories

Use this slidedeck to explore, identify rheotrical trends, and critically analyze and evaluate different examples of conpsiracy theories with students. This activity is part of the Teaching About Fake News volume, published by ALA.

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Discipline(s): 
Multidisciplinary
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CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

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Evaluating Data Visualizations for Transparent & Ethical Choices

These slides are designed to accompany the book chapter, "Evaluating Data Visualizations for Misinformation & Disinformation," by Nicole Helregel, within the ACRL book Teaching About Fake News. 

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Discipline(s): 
Multidisciplinary
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CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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