Multidisciplinary

Privacy Literacy Toolkit for K-20 librarians and educators to facilitate creation of learning experiences on privacy related topics.  Toolkit includes teaching materials, how-tos, case studies, current awareness resources, along with professional values & policy guidance.
Contributor: Alexandria Chisholm
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has Value
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This workshop is one of three in the Privacy Workshop Series at Penn State Berks.  Our series focuses on privacy issues for students in the past, present, and future.  Digital Shred deals with evaluating and shredding past digital behaviors, the Privacy Workshop focuses on privacy practices/concerns in the current moment, and Digital Leadership speaks to future implications of digital practices.In the Digital Shred Workshop, students will be able to:Reflect on and describe their digital privacy priorities in order to articulate the benefits and risks of their digital dossierApply a growth mindset to critically examine their current data exhaust // digital footprint and recognize when change is neededDevelop a Personal Data Integrity Plan that makes routine the process of auditing and updating their digital dossier in alignment with their privacy valuesDescribe “digital shred” and its importance. 
Contributor: Alexandria Chisholm
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has Value
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This lesson is designed to orient teacher education students to the library spaces and resources that support the development of multiple literacies by using a gamified tour through a series of stations throughout the library. Exploration stations are focused on themes of Indigenous perspectives and critical literacy, differentiated reading materials, leisure reading, coding and computational thinking resources, and “making” stories through unplugged STEAM activities. At each station, students engage with the resources through conversation, play, and decision-making. Students will gain an appreciation for the breadth of library resources to support the development of multiple literacies, and begin to critically appraise teaching and learning resources for the classroom. The Unlock Library Literacy workshop models a gamified approach to learning design. Students gather in small groups and engage in a self-guided exploration of stations throughout the library, with librarians available to facilitate and answer questions. An online survey platform is used to randomly move students from one station to the next, and states the tasks students must perform at each location. After completing each exploration station, students will receive a clue. After completing all required stations, students will have the code for a combination lock that they can use to unlock a box and get a prize.  
Contributor: Wendy Traas
Resource Type(s): ActivityLesson Plan
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This lesson plan uses Kevin Seeber's process cards and our newly created set of process cards that focus on news sources.  In the activities using the process cards, our students were able to define and contextualize different types of information resources, including news sources.  The tranfer and apply assessment used to close the session provides an opportunity for the students to think about how they would integrate these types of information into coursework, the workplace, and their personal lives.
Contributor: Susan Miller
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This is a lesson plan that centers around a 30-minute activity that gets students thinking and talking about the primary sources they create as they go about their daily lives, in order to prepare them to understand and contextualize the primary sources they encounter in historical research. They will also learn skills that can be transferred to future archival research. This works well as part I of a two-part interaction with classes. Typically, I go to their classroom for this lesson, meeting the students in a room in which they feel comfortable. They then come to the library several weeks later for a research-intensive workshop.
Contributor: Claire Lobdell
Resource Type(s): ActivityLesson Plan
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as Process
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This is designed as a 75 minute lesson plan. It isn’t tied to specific course content, but can be tailored to a particular course and scaled to shorter or longer class sessions. It is designed as more of a theoretical, reflective introduction to concepts of privacy and security than as a nuts-and-bolts or tech heavy workshop, and it includes a debate activity entitled "The Rewards and Risks of Convenience." It could also be used as part 1 in a two-part workshop series in which the second focuses more on specific strategies/methods/software.
Contributor: Claire Lobdell
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has Value
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
Studying music in an online setting requires that students and instructors leverage digital resources and participatory technologies with understanding and intentionality. Meta-literacy, a framework promoting critical thinking and collaboration, is an inclusive approach to understanding the complexities of information use, production, and sharing in a digital environment. This chapter explores the implications of meta-literacy for the online music classroom and identifies ways in which the librarian and music instructor can collaborate to promote student self-reflection on the use, creation, and understanding of musical information or content.  
Contributor: Rachel Scott
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
In this exploratory study the author asks students enrolled in a credit-bearing undergraduate research methods course to rank and evaluate the troublesome, transformative, and integrative nature of the six frames currently comprising the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. The results indicate that students have valid insights into threshold concept-based instruction, but may confuse the application with the theory. If practitioners are to embrace not only the frames, but also the spirit of the Framework, we must directly involve students in our teaching and research practices.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License CC-BY-NC-ND
Librarians are frequently asked to “teach” several databases in a 1-shot session, despite findings suggesting that such database demonstrations do not lead to optimal student outcomes. The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education highlights the concepts of metaliteracy and metacognition. This paper investigates ways in which I leveraged both of these concepts to reconcile my pedagogical ideals with an attempt to honor a faculty member’s request. By demonstrating question posing and making my own metacognitive processes transparent to students, I found that I could honor a faculty request for specific database demonstration while helping learners comprehend and see beyond the constructs of platform and format.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): MultidisciplinaryMusic
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License CC-BY-NC-ND

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