Learning Outcomes List

Hidden Layer: Intellectual Privacy and Generative AI

The Hidden Layer Workshop introduces key generative AI (genAI) concepts through a privacy lens. Participants probe the possibilities and limitations of genAI while considering implications for intellectual privacy, intellectual property, data sovereignty, and human agency. An original PROMPT Design Framework and worksheet guide participants through the iterative process of prompting generative AI to optimize output by specifying Persona, Requirements, Organization, Medium, Purpose, and Tone. In the centerpiece activity, participants engage in a hidden layer simulation to develop a conceptual understanding of the algorithms in the neural networks underlying LLMs and their implications for machine bias and AI hallucination. Drawing on Richards’s theory of intellectual privacy (2015) and the movement for data sovereignty, and introducing an original framework for the ethical evaluation of AI, Hidden Layer prepares participants to be critical users of genAI and synthetic media.The workshop is designed for a 60-minute session, but can be extended to fill the time available.Includes workshop guide, presentation slides, learning activities, and assessment instrument.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Scholarship as Conversation: Social Short Form Videos

Using social media examples, helping students understand how scholarship is not done in isolation but shared and a conversation. This is a lesson plan for a single class session. Included is a Learning Objectives doc for behind the scenes use, Questions Reading Activity for sharing with students, and Assessment for capturing data.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Private Bits: Privacy, Intimacy, and Consent

This sex-positive privacy literacy workshop engages participants in exploring how sex tech impacts intimate privacy and intimate relationships. Workshop content is contextualized with the theoretical frameworks of artificial intimacies (Brooks) and consentful tech (The Consentful Tech Project) and the concept of intimate privacy (Citron) and presented through a privacy literacy lens. Participants will identify artificial intimacies in order to assess real-world examples and their impact upon intimate privacy; evaluate the privacy of digital bodies under conditions of data promiscuity using a consentful tech framework; and understand intimate privacy and the impact of technology on intimate relationships and wellbeing.The workshop is designed for a 60-minute session, but can be extended to fill the time available.Includes workshop guide, presentation slides, learning activities, inclusive pedagogy tool, and assessment instrument.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Dark Patterns: Surveillance Capitalism and Business Ethics

This workshop engages participants in exploring corporate data collection, personal profiling, deceptive design, and data brokerage practices. Workshop content is contextualized with the theoretical frameworks of panoptic sort (Gandy), surveillance capitalism (Zuboff), and the four regulators (Lessig) and presented through a privacy and business ethics lens. Participants will learn how companies make money from data collection practices; explore how interface design can influence our choices and behaviors; and discuss business ethics regarding privacy and big data.The workshop is designed for 75-minute class sessions, but can be compressed into 60-minute sessions. Includes workshop guide, presentation slides, learning activities, and assessment instrument.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

#ForYou: Algorithms & the Attention Economy

By the end of the #ForYou: Algorithms & the Attention Economy workshop, students will be able to:describe recommender system algorithms in order to examine how they shape individuals' online experiences through personalizationanalyze their online behaviors and subsequent ad profiles in order to reflect on how they influence how individuals encounter, perceive, & evaluate information, leading to echo chambers & political polarizationassess how their data is used to personalize their online experience in order to build algorithmic awareness & make informed, intentional choices about their information consumption**This is a standalone workshop but also scaffolds from the Penn State Berks Privacy Workshop which gives students some foundational understanding of personal data collection practices.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Information Literacy Essential Questions

In 2019, University of Minnesota Duluth librarians developed Framework-inspired essential questions to define our pedagogical agenda. Wiggins and McTighe define essential questions as “provocative questions that foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning.” These questions reveal our information literacy priorities, inform instructional design, and facilitate ongoing engagement with key ideas.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Privacy and Dx (Digital Transformation) Workshop [Peer/Professional]

This workshop engages academic librarians and higher education professionals in considering the implications of Dx (digital transformation) for privacy, especially intellectual privacy, in higher education. The session is designed to reveal how student, faculty, and staff data and metadata are collected, along with the potential implications of such data collection. Participants assess how this data is used in order to make informed, intentional choices to safeguard student and employee privacy. The session includes a guided close-reading activity to critically examine educational technology and productivity software privacy policies and terms of service. This workshop session scaffolds from the Intellectual Privacy Workshop [Peer/Professional] and Privacy Workshop [Peer/Professional].

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Intellectual Privacy Workshop [Peer/Professional]

This workshop introduces intellectual privacy and related concepts for academic librarians and higher education professionals. The session is designed to explore the interrelationship between intellectual privacy, surveillance, the chilling effect, open inquiry, and free expression. In lieu of a prescriptive approach, participants analyze readings, case studies, and the Social Cooling infographic to consider how surveillance within the academy and society at-large can impact inquiry and expression. Privacy, the chilling effect, FERPA, and the implications of data capture and surveillance in academic libraries and higher education are considered. Participants collaborate to develop considerations and principles for data use in academic libraries and higher education based on these concepts and case studies. This workshop session scaffolds from the Privacy Workshop [Peer/Professional] and is designed for synchronous or asynchronous delivery.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Privacy Workshop [Peer/Professional]

This workshop delivers an action-oriented introduction to personal data privacy for academic librarians and higher education professionals. The session is designed to reveal the professional and educational technology systems in place to collect and analyze online behavioral data, and to unveil the real-world consequences of online profiling in contexts like academic integrity surveillance, student surveillance, and public health (COVID-19). In lieu of a prescriptive approach, participants analyze case studies to observe how online behaviors impact real-world opportunities and reflect on the benefits and risks of technology use to develop purposeful online behaviors and habits that align with their individual values. Developing knowledge practices regarding privacy and the commodification of personal information and embodying the core library values of privacy and intellectual freedom, the workshop promotes a proactive rather than reactive approach and presents a spectrum of privacy preferences across a range of contexts in order to respect participants’ autonomy and agency in personal technology use. Adapted from the student-facing Privacy Workshop.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

First Year Experience Business Information Literacy Instruction Lesson Plan and Presentation Slides

This is a lesson plan for FYE business IL session. The plan incorporated a role play active learning activity and framework concept information has value.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Type of Institution:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution License CC-BY

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