Scholarship as Conversation

Scholars in Training: Solving the Mystery

This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Jenny Yap and Sonia Robles, helps introduce first-year English and ESL composition students to the differences between scholarly and popular sources.

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CC Attribution License CC-BY

Making Zines: Content Creation with First-Year and Transfer Students

This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Nick Ferreira and Mackenzie Salisbury, is an exercise for students who understand the basic concepts of research in a college library, but need a quick refresher on college-level research and practical knowledge of their new library’s logistics.

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Not Discipline Specific
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CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Literature Reviews: An Overview for Graduate Students

Short Video: What is a literature review? What purpose does it serve in research? What should you expect when writing one? Find out here...

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Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

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Not Discipline Specific

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CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Peer Review in 3 Minutes

Short Video: How do articles get peer reviewed? What role does peer review play in scholarly research and publication?

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Not Discipline Specific

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CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

ARED 609: Multicultural Art Education

Lesson plan using framework concepts for graduate art education classes. 
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ArtEducation

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CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Working with Scholarly Articles tutorial

An interactive tutorial that helps students learn what scholarly articles are, how to find them, and how to read them using the "Scholarship as Conversation" frame as a lens.

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Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
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All Rights Reserved

The Un-Research Project sample materials

The Un-Research Project was created and implemented by Allison Hosier as part of a credit-bearing information literacy course in 2014. The project, a twist on the traditional annotated bibliography, and its connections to themes from the ACRL Framework were detailed in an article published in Communications in Information Literacy in 2015.This resource includes a list of materials associated with the project that can be adapted for use for anyone interested in implementing the un-research project or a similar one as part of their instruction.

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Not Discipline Specific
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CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Teaching Information Literacy Through "Un-Research"

Students who write essays on research topics in which no outside sources are cited and accuracy is treated as negotiable generally should not expect to receive good grades, especially in an information literacy course. However, asking students to do just this was the first step in the “un-research project,” a twist on the familiar annotated bibliography assignment that was intended to guide students away from “satisficing” with their choice of sources and toward a better understanding of scholarship as a conversation. The project was implemented as part of a credit-bearing course in spring 2014 with promising results, including a more thoughtful choice of sources on students’ part. With some fine-tuning, the un-research project can offer an effective alternative to the traditional annotated bibliography assignment and can be adapted for a variety of instructional situations.

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Not Discipline Specific

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All Rights Reserved

Leveraging New Frameworks to Teach Information Appropriation

This chapter investigates the ACRL and WPA frameworks to discuss commonalities in how they approach appropriation of information in compositional contexts.  The chapter presents two sample assignments and outlines a case study of a collaboration between library and English faculty.

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CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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