Interdisciplinary

The 3 P's: Population, Place, Problem

This is a fun, hands-on activity that can help with brainstorming a topic and/or reserach question. Can also function as an ice-breaker! The results can be informative...and also sometimes entertaining!On the slip of paper (attachment), students write their name and a Population that they'd like to focus on. then they hand it off to another student, who fills in a Place. They then hand it off to a third student, who fills in a Problem. Finally, the slip is returned to its original owner who must formulate a research question based on those three pieces of information. 

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Putting S.I.F.T. To Work

This Worksheet is based on Mike Caulfield’s S.I.F.T. Method. Students will first need to have a familiarity with that. I highly recommend the “S.I.F.T. For Teachers” video playlist on his YouTube channel and/or his website.This activity would probably take most of a class period. Could also be done online via a Discussion.

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Data vs. Information vs. Knowledge

This is a good way to get students thinking about the conceptual differences between data, information and knowledge – which is an important first step to understanding how data, information and knowledge are created, disseminated and consumed. 

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Bibliography: Reports on Misinformation & Media/News Literacy

Reports from leading organizations on Misinformation & Media/News Literacy

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CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Think-Pair-Share Worksheet for Search Terms and Strategies

This think-pair-share activity worksheet allows students to apply search terms to their own research topic and can be used after a class discussion or class lecture on library and database searching. First, students think on their own about potential search terms for their own topic. Then, they pair up and discuss how they thought of those terms and how they might use Boolean operators to connect those terms. Lastly, the pairs share with the class about what they talked about in their pairs. This resource is suitable for in-person and synchronous online instruction and takes about 10 minutes for students to complete the entire think-pair-share process.

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CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Dream Job & Dream Employer Assignment

This assignment accompanies the book chapter, "Next Level Career Research: Helping Students Land Their Dream Jobs" from Teaching Business Information Literacy published by the ACRL Press.

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Market Research for Entrepreneurs

These materials accompany the book chapter “A Tour of Public Use Market Research” from Teaching Business Information Literacy published by ACRL Press.

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Privacy and Dx (Digital Transformation) Workshop [Peer/Professional]

This workshop engages academic librarians and higher education professionals in considering the implications of Dx (digital transformation) for privacy, especially intellectual privacy, in higher education. The session is designed to reveal how student, faculty, and staff data and metadata are collected, along with the potential implications of such data collection. Participants assess how this data is used in order to make informed, intentional choices to safeguard student and employee privacy. The session includes a guided close-reading activity to critically examine educational technology and productivity software privacy policies and terms of service. This workshop session scaffolds from the Intellectual Privacy Workshop [Peer/Professional] and Privacy Workshop [Peer/Professional].

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CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Intellectual Privacy Workshop [Peer/Professional]

This workshop introduces intellectual privacy and related concepts for academic librarians and higher education professionals. The session is designed to explore the interrelationship between intellectual privacy, surveillance, the chilling effect, open inquiry, and free expression. In lieu of a prescriptive approach, participants analyze readings, case studies, and the Social Cooling infographic to consider how surveillance within the academy and society at-large can impact inquiry and expression. Privacy, the chilling effect, FERPA, and the implications of data capture and surveillance in academic libraries and higher education are considered. Participants collaborate to develop considerations and principles for data use in academic libraries and higher education based on these concepts and case studies. This workshop session scaffolds from the Privacy Workshop [Peer/Professional] and is designed for synchronous or asynchronous delivery.

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CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Privacy Workshop [Peer/Professional]

This workshop delivers an action-oriented introduction to personal data privacy for academic librarians and higher education professionals. The session is designed to reveal the professional and educational technology systems in place to collect and analyze online behavioral data, and to unveil the real-world consequences of online profiling in contexts like academic integrity surveillance, student surveillance, and public health (COVID-19). In lieu of a prescriptive approach, participants analyze case studies to observe how online behaviors impact real-world opportunities and reflect on the benefits and risks of technology use to develop purposeful online behaviors and habits that align with their individual values. Developing knowledge practices regarding privacy and the commodification of personal information and embodying the core library values of privacy and intellectual freedom, the workshop promotes a proactive rather than reactive approach and presents a spectrum of privacy preferences across a range of contexts in order to respect participants’ autonomy and agency in personal technology use. Adapted from the student-facing Privacy Workshop.

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CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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