Framework as a Whole

Bibliography of (short) Videos About Misinformation & News/Media Literacy

List of nearly two dozen short (~5 min) videos that deal with various topics related to Misinformation & News/Media Literacy. Prompt Questions included for each video. Great to use for a class activity/assignment.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Misinformation and Media Literacy - Research Guide

Tabs/Topics: Categories of Misinformation, Evaluating Information, Media Bias Charts, Classroom Activities, Videos, Podcasts, Infographics, More Resources

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License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Reflective Teaching Form

This Google Form can be used for you to track information about your instruction in one-shot and embedded information literacy sessions.  Reflecting upon your current instruction is a critical step in becoming a more effective information literacy instructor.  This form will allow you to track class information (e.g. professor, number of students, date of instruction, length of instruction), general feedback on the session (e.g. what worked well, what could have gone better), lesson planning details (e.g. which ACRL Frames were incorporated, what tools were used for assessment, when assessment was implemented), and findings from your assessment.  You can generate a Google Sheet to view all your entries, returning to past entries and reflections when you teach similar content or classes in the future to remember what aspects worked well and what you might want to change to have a more successful session.To use this form, create a copy to your Google Drive, which will allow you to tweak, add, or remove questions so that you can tailor the form for your own reflections on your teaching practice.  

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Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution License CC-BY

Information Literacy Essential Questions

In 2019, University of Minnesota Duluth librarians developed Framework-inspired essential questions to define our pedagogical agenda. Wiggins and McTighe define essential questions as “provocative questions that foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning.” These questions reveal our information literacy priorities, inform instructional design, and facilitate ongoing engagement with key ideas.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Battling Fake Science News: The Power of Framing

This is a Power Point presentation that goes with a chapter on how to address fake science news through the use of framing. 

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License Assigned: 
All Rights Reserved

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Faculty Conversations: Bringing the Next Level of “Fake News” Library Instruction into the Classroom

This resource is designed to accompany "Chapter 23:  Faculty Conversations:  Bringing the Next Level of “Fake News” Library Instruction into the Classroom" from the ACRL book Teaching About Fake News: Lesson Plans for Different Disciplines and Audiences. Description:  The librarian will lead the faculty member(s) through a conversation/discussion that will identify and prioritize the critical thinking skills necessary to evaluate fake news in a library instruction session.  During the conversation, the librarian will advocate for the librarian’s role as an educator in this kind of instruction.

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Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA

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The Fake News-Pseudoscience Connection

Slide deck for chapter "Establishing the Fake News-Pseudoscience Connection in a Workshop for Graduate Students" 

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License Assigned: 
All Rights Reserved

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Memes are Not Facts

For our classes on mis/disinformation, we chose to focus on having students analyze memes that present some sort of “factual” information. So, think memes with text on them that purport to give information to the reader. We do our best to choose memes that are not political in any way. We have students first look critically at the meme to suss out the elements of authority, motivation, content, potential for fact-checking, and more. What follows is a breakdown of our assignment.

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Discipline(s): 
Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: 
All Rights Reserved

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Intro to Business Research Canvas Course

Canvas module covering how to conduct business research. Designed for undergrads to complete over a full semester. 

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Discipline(s): 
Business

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License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA

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