Scholarship as Conversation

Evaluating Sources Rubric

Rubric used to score student annotated bibliographies in order to evaluate the learning outcomes "Students will be able to evaluate sources based on information need and the context in which the information will be used" and "Students will be able to identify multiple perspectives on a research topic."

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Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
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CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Writing a Literature Review

Writing a literature review can seem like a daunting task. It involves finding sources, synthesizing them, and relating them to your research topic. This workshop will guide you through the process of writing a literature review, providing plenty of examples and tips along the way.By the end of this activity, you'll be able to:Recognize key components of a literature reviewIdentify a knowledge gap in previous research and express how you can address the gapOrganize sources effectively and logicallyThe workshop includes interactive video animations and self-assessment questions.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Citing Sources the APA Way

In this interactive Coassemble module, students are taught the basics of APA format (7th edition). The module begins with a discussion about the disciplines that use APA. It then moves into a lessons on in-text citations, as well as article, book, and website References page citations. Finally, students learn about basic APA paper format, from the title page to the References page. Checkpoints appear at the end of each lesson to test and reinforce knowledge.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific

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License Assigned: 
All Rights Reserved

The C.R.E.A.T.E.S. website

Created in collaboration with Dr. Jordan Moberg Parker, UCLA's Director of Undergraduate Laboratory Curriculum and Assessment in Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, C.R.E.A.T.E.S. is a set of 6 steps that help learners read and critically analyze scientific papers. The C.R.E.A.T.E.S. method, pioneered by Dr. Sally Hoskins, has a demonstrated positive impact on undergraduate students' self-confidence in scientific reading, as well as in their general perceptions of and beliefs about science and scientific thinking (Hoskins, et. al, 2017).The new C.R.E.A.T.E.S. site uses interactive media, step-by-step directions, and detailed annotation of authentic examples to guide students through the process.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

MOOC BoniCI

An open access MOOC in French to bonify the information literacy skills of university students (with Moodle).

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CC Attribution License CC-BY

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Engaging Students: Using the MLA International Bibliography to Teach the Research Process

This is a recorded webcast presentation featuring tips on using the MLA International Bibliography to teach scholarly research concepts and analytical skills.

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Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

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All Rights Reserved

Politics, Science, and Media

If there were a list of things I absolutely required all my students to understand before leaving my class, the relationship between mass media, politics, and science would be close to the top of the list. But there are a lot of moving parts in these relationships, so the terrain is difficult to traverse.  As one might expect of a difficult topic, there is much to read and a lot to unpack.   This pathfinder discusses how politics and our mass media system complicate the dissemination of important scientific information. 
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA

Cast Your Students as Scholars

This is a participatory, variable lesson frame ready for you to modify to suit your instruction needs. This lesson and it's variations focuses on encouraging students to see themselves as information creators and part of the scholarly conversation and can also variously include conversations about about the scholarly information cycle and/or authority depending on instruction constraints and configuration.Start with StudentScholarLessonPlan.pdf below.

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CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Meta-literacy in the online music classroom: Opportunities for instructor and librarian collaboration

Studying music in an online setting requires that students and instructors leverage digital resources and participatory technologies with understanding and intentionality. Meta-literacy, a framework promoting critical thinking and collaboration, is an inclusive approach to understanding the complexities of information use, production, and sharing in a digital environment. This chapter explores the implications of meta-literacy for the online music classroom and identifies ways in which the librarian and music instructor can collaborate to promote student self-reflection on the use, creation, and understanding of musical information or content.  
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All Rights Reserved

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