College-level

The Choosing Information paths lesson is mapped to the Information as Creation Process Frame and helps students learn to recognize that information may be perceived differently based on the format in which it is packaged. In this lesson, students identify various characteristics of information formats, and match information needs to the most appropriate digital format. Moreover, students observe the changes that occur to information as it is repackaged in different formats, and evaluate the results. In this lesson students will learn how to:Match information needs with the most useful digital formatName the properties of various digital formatsExplore the differences between content as delivered in different formats
Contributor: Joelle Pitts
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as Process
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
"Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe, Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, shares her views about the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. She believes that that the Framework is one among many documents adopted by the Association of College and Research Libraries that academic librarians can and should use to promote information literacy. This interview was conducted in May 2016."
Contributor: Lisa Hinchliffe
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This lesson plan is designed to move students from a "Google experience" of information to the use of academic, peer-reviewed, and primary resources available within the Hesburgh Libraries. Dr. Kelly and I formulated a lesson that get at the heart of information literacy within the context of a Writing & Rhetoric course. The following writing assignment focuses on first year undergraduate students getting connected to information resources that will alow exploration of various points of view and themselves as contributors and consumers of information that contributes to the scholarly nature of rhetorical analysis.
Contributor: Leslie L Morgan
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Discipline(s): English
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This is a guest post at ACRLog.org, published on January 27, 2015, in which I reflect on the relationship between the Framework and assessment of student learning in and through our information literacy programs, as well as how this relates to the eventual rescission of the Information Literacy Competency Standards (formally rescinded a year and a half later on June 25, 2016). Note that the timing of the post was about a week before the ACRL Board of Directors moved to 'file' the Framework (on February 2, 2015); a year later the Framework was formally adopted by the ACRL Board on January 11, 2016. Though the post is almost two years old (as of this writing), the ideas in it may prove valuable to those seeking to integrate the Framework into their local curricula through the cyclical program review process that all curricula undergo. 
Contributor: Donna Witek
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
PDF of PPT Slides from Presentation at LOEX Fall Focus 2015. The Framework issues an invitation to exploration and location adaptation that is worthy of attention. This presentation accepts that invitation and provides cases studies in developing additional frames/concepts - "information social justice" and "information apprenticeship in community" - as well as a process for articulating additional frames.
Contributor: Lisa Hinchliffe
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: Not Applicable
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
The Hip Hop LibGuide is a scholarly comprehensive online resource about Hip Hop Information Literacy and the artform in general. The libguide has been developed to engage novice, intermediate, and skilled learners that are interested in learning more about the culture, social issues, and artistic components of Hip Hop.
Contributor: kYmberly Keeton
Resource Type(s): Research Guide
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This workshet is a set of reflective questions based on the six frames which are designed for librarians or disciplinary experts to intentionally reflect on their information literacy practices.
Contributor: Sara D. Miller
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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