Classroom-level

Deciding who to vote for can be hard. On top of that, finding information about local elections can sometimes be difficult, as can be figuring out if you agree with a candidate on an issue that you don’t know too much about. This activity engages students in the civic process and in research. Students will use internet searching to find information about candidates, and database searching to find information out about an issue. 
Contributor: Faith Rusk
Resource Type(s): ActivityWorksheet
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
A list of criteria to help students check if they followed all steps to create an optimized search strategy. We used it for searches in engineering database, but it can be used in all fields. For certain fields, it might need small modifications. Aussi disponible en français dans la "Sandbox".
Contributor: Christine Brodeur
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Searching as Strategic Exploration
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: CollegeUniversity
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
Grille de vérification que les étudiants peuvent remplir après avoir développé une stratégie pour s'assurer d'avoir réfléchi à toutes les facettes de leur stratégie. En français (English version also available in the Sandbox)
Contributor: Christine Brodeur
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Searching as Strategic Exploration
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: CollegeUniversity
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
In this activity, students work in groups to craft a response to a presidential tweet from an assigned perspective (e.g. right or left leaning news source). In doing so, they are required to find, evaluate, and effectively use information to make a case. Unlike a research paper, which aspires to be neutral or unbiased, this activity asks students to respond to a tweet from a particular perspective, with a particular bias, requiring them to engage with their sources in a new way. The activity is followed by a discussion of students' interactions with the information they found and presented. 
Contributor: Faith Rusk
Resource Type(s): ActivityAssignment Prompt
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This is a recorded webcast presentation featuring tips on using the MLA International Bibliography to teach scholarly research concepts and analytical skills.
Contributor: Angela Ecklund
Resource Type(s): Conference Presentation
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as ConversationSearching as Strategic Exploration
Type of Institution: CollegeUniversity
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
The MLA provides short tutorial videos that help users make the most of the bibliography’s rich metadata and its advanced searching and filtering features. New and updated tutorials are released throughout the year.If you have a suggestion for a topic that you would like to see covered in a tutorial, please let us know by sending an e-mail to bibliography@mla.org.
Contributor: Angela Ecklund
Resource Type(s): Tutorial
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Searching as Strategic Exploration
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This lesson plan uses Kevin Seeber's process cards and our newly created set of process cards that focus on news sources.  In the activities using the process cards, our students were able to define and contextualize different types of information resources, including news sources.  The tranfer and apply assessment used to close the session provides an opportunity for the students to think about how they would integrate these types of information into coursework, the workplace, and their personal lives.
Contributor: Susan Miller
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
If there were a list of things I absolutely required all my students to understand before leaving my class, the relationship between mass media, politics, and science would be close to the top of the list. But there are a lot of moving parts in these relationships, so the terrain is difficult to traverse.  As one might expect of a difficult topic, there is much to read and a lot to unpack.   This pathfinder discusses how politics and our mass media system complicate the dissemination of important scientific information. 
Contributor: Todd Heldt
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
The Critical Information Literacy Lesson Plan includes a lesson plan with a bibliography of assigned readings and discussion questions for students as well as presentation slides with main points from the lesson: definition of critical information literacy, evaluating information is a process, authority is constructed and contextual, how to evaluate information, and check the facts.
Contributor: Latia Ward
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This is a lesson plan that centers around a 30-minute activity that gets students thinking and talking about the primary sources they create as they go about their daily lives, in order to prepare them to understand and contextualize the primary sources they encounter in historical research. They will also learn skills that can be transferred to future archival research. This works well as part I of a two-part interaction with classes. Typically, I go to their classroom for this lesson, meeting the students in a room in which they feel comfortable. They then come to the library several weeks later for a research-intensive workshop.
Contributor: Claire Lobdell
Resource Type(s): ActivityLesson Plan
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as Process
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY

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