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Sound Science or Fake News? Evaluating and Interpreting Scientific Sources

These slides are designed to accompany Chapter 16: "Sound Science or Fake News?: Evaluating and Interpreting Scientific Sources Using the ACRL Framework" by Anna Mary Williford and Charlotte Ford, from the ACRL book Teaching About Fake News: Lesson Plans for Different Disciplines and Audiences.
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Reading Scientific Research

Academic research articles have a structure and language that is different from our other reading materials such as textbooks. This lesson can help students new to academic research understand these differences and learn strategies for finding information in such articles.

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Would You Share It?

A slide presentation to accompany the learning activity from the chapter "Senior Citizens, Digital Citizens: Improving Information Consumption in Older Adults" in Teaching about Fake News: Lesson Plans for Different Disciplines and Audiences. This lesson demonstrates some of the most common types of misinformation senior citizens may encounter using social media and evaluation techniques to prevent sharing with others. 

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Bot or Not: Recognizing Fake News Primary Sources on Social Media

These materials were created to complement the "Bot or Not?" learning activity described in "Chapter 12: Fact-Checking Viral Trends for News Writers," in Teaching About Fake News: Lesson Plans for Different Disciplines and Audiences (2021). Students are to divide into groups, take a tweet provided by the instructor (samples are included in the link), and use evaluative methods introduced in the session to determine the veracity and newsworthiness of both the Twitter account and the tweet itself.

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The Fake News-Pseudoscience Connection

Slide deck for chapter "Establishing the Fake News-Pseudoscience Connection in a Workshop for Graduate Students" 

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Creating Clickbait Headlines and Fabricated Personas

This PowerPoint and associated learning activity accompany "Chapter 20: Mediated Lives: A Cultural Studies Perspective to Discussing “Fake-News” with First-Year College Students" in Teaching About Fake News: Lesson Plans for Diverse Disciplines and Audiences (2021).  In this lesson, students learn about mediation, fake news, and how internet content is catered to specific demographics of social media users.  In the activity to follow, students create their own clickbait headlines for multiple imagined audiences. 

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Interdisciplinary
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Memes are Not Facts

For our classes on mis/disinformation, we chose to focus on having students analyze memes that present some sort of “factual” information. So, think memes with text on them that purport to give information to the reader. We do our best to choose memes that are not political in any way. We have students first look critically at the meme to suss out the elements of authority, motivation, content, potential for fact-checking, and more. What follows is a breakdown of our assignment.

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Interdisciplinary
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Digital Shred Privacy Literacy Toolkit

Privacy Literacy Toolkit for K-20 librarians and educators to facilitate creation of learning experiences on privacy related topics.  Toolkit includes teaching materials, how-tos, case studies, current awareness resources, along with professional values & policy guidance.

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Meta-literacy in the online music classroom: Opportunities for instructor and librarian collaboration

Studying music in an online setting requires that students and instructors leverage digital resources and participatory technologies with understanding and intentionality. Meta-literacy, a framework promoting critical thinking and collaboration, is an inclusive approach to understanding the complexities of information use, production, and sharing in a digital environment. This chapter explores the implications of meta-literacy for the online music classroom and identifies ways in which the librarian and music instructor can collaborate to promote student self-reflection on the use, creation, and understanding of musical information or content.  
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Transformative? Integrative? Troublesome? Undergraduate Student Reflections on Information Literacy Threshold Concepts.

In this exploratory study the author asks students enrolled in a credit-bearing undergraduate research methods course to rank and evaluate the troublesome, transformative, and integrative nature of the six frames currently comprising the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. The results indicate that students have valid insights into threshold concept-based instruction, but may confuse the application with the theory. If practitioners are to embrace not only the frames, but also the spirit of the Framework, we must directly involve students in our teaching and research practices.
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