Classroom-level

This reading provides a broad overview of the topic of "fake news" and discusses the inherent difficulty of "fixing" the problem.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog PostLearning Object
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This handout lists different ways that information may be incorrectly or unethically presented to audiences and offers suggestions for correctly using information.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
This exercise gives students a model for approaching a research task, beginning with general information and ending with more in-depth sources. Discussion can focus on research as inquiry, research as strategic exploration, and the context and construction of authority. Students are required to cite their sources using both MLA and APA.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Assignment Prompt
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
Second of two library sessions provided to a introductory writing course. This is a scaffolded session focuses on visual literacy skills through the analysis of infographics and comics.
Contributor: Justina Elmore
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as Process
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
First of two library sessions provided to a introductory writing course. This session focuses on conducting research.
Contributor: Justina Elmore
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as ProcessScholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
This lesson is intended as a single session within a major’s research methods course. Rather than using a shorter “scholarly vs. non-scholarly” comparison worksheet, this activity asks students to work in groups to systematically examine a scholarly article in depth, identify and evaluate its various components visually and in writing, and then compare it to a non-scholarly article on the same topic. Groups then report back to the entire class. Discussion is guided so as to touch on the processes by which sources are created, what these methods say about their authority, and to consider contextually appropriate uses for them. Although the activity was developed for students taking two social science majors' research methods courses (SOC 323 and ANTH 305), it could be adapted to any setting that lends itself to in-depth examination of information creation processes, the construction of authority, and the contextual appropriateness of sources.
Contributor: Krista Bowers Sharpe
Resource Type(s): ActivityLesson PlanWorksheet
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: CollegeUniversity
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
Frame: Scholarship as Conversation Context: Lesson presented in the context of a one-shot, 50-minute library instruction session, with course libguide containing the multimedia presentations used for the lesson, organized in either boxes or tabs. Appropriate supplementary instructional content can be added to the libguide as needed.Lesson:Librarian overview of the frame of “Scholarship as Conversation” and why it is relevant to the students and their academic work. Focus on regarding scholarship as not a static “truth” frozen in time, but a process whereby researchers are in a continuum of inquiry and within which variation in research results comprises a “scholarly conversation.”Present Youtube video produced by librarian Anna Eisen entitled “Research 101: Scholarship as Conversation” accessible at https://youtu.be/YGia3gNyHDM to introduce the threshold concept.Next, present an NPR episode of the podcast “The Hidden Brain: A Conversation about Life’s Unseen Patterns” hosted by Shankar Vedantam, entitled “Scientific Findings Often Fail To Be Replicated, Researchers Say” aired on NPR on August 28, 2015 (access at: http://www.npr.org/2015/08/28/435416046/research-results-often-fail-to-be-replicated-researchers-say) Vedantam described a project headed by Dr. Brian Nosek at the University of Virginia in which researchers tried to replicate a hundred psychology experiments that were published in three leading journals. The results of the project were disappointing—nearly two thirds of the results of the experiments could not be replicated. Replication of results is a gold standard to measure quality of scientific research. An anecdotal topic referred to in the podcast was the research related to the health effects of coffee on the human body. Coffee and its health benefits (or lack thereof) are frequently discussed in the news media and was adopted as an example to utilize for an active learning component during the library instruction session.Distribute copies of the article “Health Effects of Coffee: Where Do We Stand?” at http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/14/health/coffee-health/index.html by Sandee LaMotte and published on the CNN website on August 14, 2015.  This article presents a chronology of “conventional wisdom,” popular beliefs, and research findings regarding the health effects of coffee intake from the 1500s to the present.Request that students break up into pairs, and review and discuss the article on coffee in light of the information they have just taken in via the the Youtube video and the NPR story.After 10 minutes, prompt and encourage the students to share their thoughts, analyses, conclusions, and insights regarding the content presented.Circle back to course purview and research assignments, and emphasize to students that they are “emerging researchers and emerging scholars” and they are the next participants in the conversation. They may be the contributors of new research knowledge in the future. 
Contributor: Jenny Innes
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
The three rubrics here were designed for an introductory course for English majors, but the ways in which the ACRL Framework is used could be replicated for any discipline and could be extended to program assessment.  Each rubric addresses one ARCL Frame.  The ACRL "dispositions" are treated as desired learning outcomes; the ACRL "knowledge practices" play the role of descriptors.  The rubric is intended to be used not simply on a student-produced project or activity, but on a project and a structured student reflection taken together.
Contributor: Terry Riley
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This handout provides a crosswalk between the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education.  Librarians using this handout are prompted to describe their past instruction and service experiences that are related to each frame for the purposes of sparking ideas for programming and learning activities related to the Framework. The handout is designed to ease the transition from using the Standards to embracing the Framework in instruction and programming.  The FIU Information Litearcy Framework combines the Outcomes of the Standards with the Knowledge Practices of the Framework to provide assessable indicators of information literacy competencies in students.
Contributor: Ava Brillat
Resource Type(s): Instruction Program Material
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
The assignment prompt and description, Exploring Expertise, is attached. It is a writing prompt for a short assignment. The prompt can be adapted to fit different non-writing performance tasks, however, including discussion or in-class individual/ small group activities. Students are provided a scenario wherein they must research the names of experts quoted in different online news articles (topic: prescription drug abuse). They must show that they have researched the "expert." Learning Outcome - Explore a source of information in order to determine the validity and credibility of their claims on a particular topic  
Contributor: Cristy Moran
Resource Type(s): ActivityAssignment Prompt
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY

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