Multidisciplinary

The Choosing Information paths lesson is mapped to the Information as Creation Process Frame and helps students learn to recognize that information may be perceived differently based on the format in which it is packaged. In this lesson, students identify various characteristics of information formats, and match information needs to the most appropriate digital format. Moreover, students observe the changes that occur to information as it is repackaged in different formats, and evaluate the results. In this lesson students will learn how to:Match information needs with the most useful digital formatName the properties of various digital formatsExplore the differences between content as delivered in different formats
Contributor: Joelle Pitts
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as Process
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
Rubric developed in collaboration with FYW faculty.
Contributor: Spencer Brayton
Resource Type(s): Rubric
Discipline(s): EnglishMultidisciplinary
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This resource includes files and links for the conference paper and slides of the presentation Rhetorical Reinventions: Rethinking Research Processes and Information Practices to Deepen our Pedagogy, presented at LOEX 2016 by Donna Witek, Mary J. Snyder Broussard, and Joel M. Burkholder. Both the slides and the paper include a detailed bibliography of related resources.Presentation/Paper Abstract:The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy offers instruction librarians an opportunity to reconsider not only how they teach but also how they think about research and information. This new thinking has the potential to reinvent instructional practices, resulting in learning that is both situated and transferable. The discipline of rhetoric can inform this effort.This presentation will consider three traditional “steps” of the research process: question formulation, information search, and source evaluation. Traditional approaches over-simplify each activity: broaden the question by including related elements or narrow it by concentrating on a specific time/area/population; follow these steps to find the “correct” number and types of sources; and evaluate information based on the presence of external characteristics.Yet when information literacy is approached rhetorically, librarians can partner with classroom faculty to teach much more meaningful and transferable information literacy knowledge, skills, and dispositions. Librarians can then guide students in the complex processes of navigating the expectations of disciplinary audiences and developing a critical self-awareness of themselves as scholarly contributors; engaging with search tools, strategies, and processes in ways that are flexible, iterative, and exploratory by design; and comprehending more fully their information sources for deeper evaluation that better meets their own rhetorical goals. In an interactive presentation, the presenters will explore how rhetoric and composition theories have the potential—with creative and strategic thinking—to work in synergy with the Framework, make information literacy more authentic and meaningful, and develop true lifelong learners.
Contributor: Donna Witek
Type of Institution: Not Applicable
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
Covering necessary information literacy topics in a traditional "one shot" session can be difficult. To address this challenge, a suite of interactive online modules were developed to provide active learning lessons on various information literacy topics. The modules can be used in fully online, flipped or face-to-face courses and can be integrated into a learning management system (LMS) so student knowledge and progress can be tracked and assessed. Developed using Articulate Storyline, the sources files are available as open source downloads under a GNU General Public License (GPLv3) from the Marquette University Libraries GitHub site. Please feel free to download and continue to enhance and improve these modules.
Contributor: Eric Kowalik
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
Students often feel like outsiders in their courses.  Their professors speak a different "language" and have different values.  If scholarship is a "Conversation," students need to grasp what forces and cultures drive scholars within a discipline to converse the way they do.  This slide presentation lays out the main features of disciplinary culture, the basis of all conversations.  If students can learn to "read" disciplines effectively, they will be better able to grasp the nature of conversations as they do their research.
Contributor: William Badke
Resource Type(s): Slide Deck
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
A Prezi presentation that details the threshold concepts of the Framework as a description of how scholars (and developing scholars) do research.  
Contributor: William Badke
Resource Type(s): Slide Deck
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
Research Services librarians at Bucknell University collaborated on a project to make the research concepts the Framework represents more accessible to students.  This is an open educational resource in the form of digital and physical customizable posters.The research guide includes a repository for capturing ideas and suggestions for reusing, remixing, and re-conceptualizing the posters. This project opens pathways for librarians, instructional technologists, and faculty to communicate and collaborate on student-centered information literacy instruction. 
Contributor: Nancy Frazier
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This workshet is a set of reflective questions based on the six frames which are designed for librarians or disciplinary experts to intentionally reflect on their information literacy practices.
Contributor: Sara D. Miller
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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