Multidisciplinary

Think-Pair-Share Worksheet for Search Terms and Strategies

This think-pair-share activity worksheet allows students to apply search terms to their own research topic and can be used after a class discussion or class lecture on library and database searching. First, students think on their own about potential search terms for their own topic. Then, they pair up and discuss how they thought of those terms and how they might use Boolean operators to connect those terms. Lastly, the pairs share with the class about what they talked about in their pairs. This resource is suitable for in-person and synchronous online instruction and takes about 10 minutes for students to complete the entire think-pair-share process.

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CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

STEM Honors Citations and Bibliographies Class Activities

Learning Outcomes:Students will see best practices on citations for their poster session or honors paper, including key database and RaptorSearch examples.Students will receive a demonstration of the relationship between their reference list and their in-text citations.Students will see examples of how to better integrate citations into their writing, including examples of paraphrasing, summarizing, and incorporating multiple sources or switches among sources.

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BiologyMultidisciplinary
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CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Critically Appraised Topics in Evidence-based Management: Classroom Activities 1 and 2

These materials accompany the book chapter “Using Critically Appraised Topics to Teach Evidence-based Management to Graduate Business Students” from Teaching Business Information Literacy published by ACRL Press.

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CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA

A new study says...[ppt]

Powerpoint to accompany science information literacy activity following a news article back to a research article.  Created by Megan Carlton and Lea Leininger.  Accompanies chapter How the scientific method invalidates ‘fake news.’ From the book Teaching About Fake News: Lesson Plans for Different Disciplines and Audiences. Benjes-Small, C. M., Wittig, C., & Oberlies, M. K. (Eds.). (2021): https://uncg.on.worldcat.org/v2/oclc/1262768350

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CC Attribution License CC-BY

#ForYou: Algorithms & the Attention Economy

By the end of the #ForYou: Algorithms & the Attention Economy workshop, students will be able to:describe recommender system algorithms in order to examine how they shape individuals' online experiences through personalizationanalyze their online behaviors and subsequent ad profiles in order to reflect on how they influence how individuals encounter, perceive, & evaluate information, leading to echo chambers & political polarizationassess how their data is used to personalize their online experience in order to build algorithmic awareness & make informed, intentional choices about their information consumption**This is a standalone workshop but also scaffolds from the Penn State Berks Privacy Workshop which gives students some foundational understanding of personal data collection practices.

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CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Information Literacy Essential Questions

In 2019, University of Minnesota Duluth librarians developed Framework-inspired essential questions to define our pedagogical agenda. Wiggins and McTighe define essential questions as “provocative questions that foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning.” These questions reveal our information literacy priorities, inform instructional design, and facilitate ongoing engagement with key ideas.

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CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Curiosity and Asking Questions

Slides from a lesson plan focused on developing curiosity and formulating questions. Students complete a curiosity self-assessment developed by librarians at Oregon State University, discuss what curiosity looks like in their academic and personal lives, and practice developing questions about essays they've read in class using the Question Formulation Technique. The lesson was inspired by this article: Rempel, Hannah Gascho, and Anne-Marie Deitering. "Sparking-curiosity—Librarians’ role in encouraging exploration." In the Library with the Lead Pipe (2017). 

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CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Sound Science or Fake News? Evaluating and Interpreting Scientific Sources

These slides are designed to accompany Chapter 16: "Sound Science or Fake News?: Evaluating and Interpreting Scientific Sources Using the ACRL Framework" by Anna Mary Williford and Charlotte Ford, from the ACRL book Teaching About Fake News: Lesson Plans for Different Disciplines and Audiences.
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Critically Evaluating Conspiracy Theories

Use this slidedeck to explore, identify rheotrical trends, and critically analyze and evaluate different examples of conpsiracy theories with students. This activity is part of the Teaching About Fake News volume, published by ALA.

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Discipline(s): 
Multidisciplinary
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CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

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Evaluating Data Visualizations for Transparent & Ethical Choices

These slides are designed to accompany the book chapter, "Evaluating Data Visualizations for Misinformation & Disinformation," by Nicole Helregel, within the ACRL book Teaching About Fake News. 

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Multidisciplinary
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CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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