College-level

Inform Your Thinking: Who Do You Trust and Why?

The Inform Your Thinking video series introduces students to the frames of the ACRL Framework in an easy-to-understand manner by using conversational tone, approachable peer hosts, relatable comparisons, and eye-catching graphics. This video introduces students to the Authority is Constructed and Contextual frame by showing how being an authority on a topic varies by context and information need, and may shift from one situation to the next. Students will glean tips for discerning authority with academic topics by deciphering author credibility, recognizing the value of peer-review, and examining the evidence. 

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Inform Your Thinking: Research is a Conversation

The Inform Your Thinking video series introduces students to the frames of the ACRL Framework in an easy-to-understand manner by using conversational tone, approachable peer hosts, relatable comparisons, and eye-catching graphics. This video introduces students to the Scholarship as Conversation frame by comparing research to conversations between different “voices” that each contribute a unique perspective on a topic. Students will explore useful tips on becoming a part of this conversation within their specific field of study, as well as how to decipher the voices in certain conversations.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Ethical Use of Information in Presentations

This lesson plan from Teaching Information Literacy Threshold Concepts, edited by Patricia Bravender, Hazel McClure, and Gayle Schaub and contributed by Debbie Morrow, concentrates on the value of information and the need to acknowledge that value through accurate attribution of sources, focusing not on print sources but on images and their use within the context of a presentation.

Resource Type(s):

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
All Rights Reserved

From Nothing to Something: Transforming the “Failed” Search

This lesson plan from Teaching Information Literacy Threshold Concepts, edited by Patricia Bravender, Hazel McClure, and Gayle Schaub and contributed by Ika Datig, addresses the search strategies and discovery tools students need to employ to recognize the possible reasons for setbacks and continue their research.

Resource Type(s):

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
All Rights Reserved

Information Life Cycle

This lesson plan from Teaching Information Literacy Threshold Concepts, edited by Patricia Bravender, Hazel McClure, and Gayle Schaub and contributed by Toni M. Carter and Todd Aldridge, engages students with content in a way that compels them to consider the format of information each time they consider using it in their work.

Resource Type(s):

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
All Rights Reserved

Determining the Relevance and Reliability of Information Sources

This lesson plan from Teaching Information Literacy Threshold Concepts, edited by Patricia Bravender, Hazel McClure, and Gayle Schaub and contributed by Nancy Fawley, provides beginning students with a checklist to get them thinking critically about information’s origins, purpose, and complexity, and takes them into a deeper discussion about how to apply those evaluative criteria.

Resource Type(s):

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
All Rights Reserved

Crime Scene Investigation as an Analogy for Scholarly Inquiry

This lesson plan from Teaching Information Literacy Threshold Concepts, edited by Patricia Bravender, Hazel McClure, and Gayle Schaub and contributed by Robert Farrell, provides students with a practical analogy for scholarly inquiry using an example they are all familiar with, crime scene investigation.

Resource Type(s):

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
All Rights Reserved

The Conversational Nature of Sources

This lesson plan from Teaching Information Literacy Threshold Concepts, edited by Patricia Bravender, Hazel McClure, and Gayle Schaub and contributed by Andrea Baer, introduces students to the idea that scholarship is a conversation.

Resource Type(s):

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
All Rights Reserved

Top Secret Recipes: Internet Search Hacks Every Student Researcher Should Know

This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Amanda Foster, details a class that asks students to explore the advanced search capabilities of Google and introduces them to free online research tools used by successful researchers..

Resource Type(s):

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Scholars in Training: Solving the Mystery

This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Jenny Yap and Sonia Robles, helps introduce first-year English and ESL composition students to the differences between scholarly and popular sources.

Resource Type(s):

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution License CC-BY

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