College-level

This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Amanda Foster, details a class that asks students to explore the advanced search capabilities of Google and introduces them to free online research tools used by successful researchers..
Resource Type(s): ActivityPublication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Searching as Strategic Exploration
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Jenny Yap and Sonia Robles, helps introduce first-year English and ESL composition students to the differences between scholarly and popular sources.
Resource Type(s): ActivityPublication
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Kyrille Goldbeck DeBose, is a set of lesson plans originally designed for a First-Year Experience (FYE) course taught to familiarize students with several concepts across the Framework and create a foundational knowledge base to be built upon throughout their academic careers.
Resource Type(s): ActivityPublication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Nick Ferreira and Mackenzie Salisbury, is an exercise for students who understand the basic concepts of research in a college library, but need a quick refresher on college-level research and practical knowledge of their new library’s logistics.
Resource Type(s): ActivityPublication
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Joy Oehlers, demonstrates a fun group activity that uses a familiar tool for ESOL students to make sense of their library collections and basic services.
Resource Type(s): ActivityPublication
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Jacalyn Bryan and Elana Karshmer, describes a three-part orientation activity designed to introduce new students to library resources and services.
Resource Type(s): ActivityPublication
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This link was an experiment joining a small seminar-style class (LIBR201) with a large lecture class (A/HI271). Ten students registered for both courses. During a Writing Instruction Support retreat that both faculty attended in August 2013, they developed the linked aspect of the course by working through the overarching pedagogical theory driving this particular retreat, the idea of the “threshold concept,” which Dr. Carmen Werder has described as a “discipline-based concept that provides a transformational understanding and entrance to that discipline.” The instructors developed a threshold concept that helped to bind their courses together: “Data are not only textual but also visual and oral; there are data beyond texts.” This concept became the organizing principle for how the Link would function.
Contributor: Sylvia Tag
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as InquiryFramework as a Whole
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
The Citations lesson is mapped to Information has Value and Scholarship as Conversation Frames. It discusses why citations are a foundation of scholarly communication and the basic components of a citation. Through infographics and videos, students will learn the differences between paraphrasing, summarizing and quoting.
Contributor: Joelle Pitts
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has ValueScholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
College & Research Libraries News article about using the Framework to make sense of local curricula as they relate to information literacy goals and outcomes. Also discusses the Framework in light of "developmental outcomes," i.e., outcomes that are sequenced within a curriculum. 
Contributor: Donna Witek
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
The Search Strategies lesson is mapped to the Searching as Strategic Exploration Frame and introduces the concept of strategic searching in order to use search tools more effectively. By understanding strategic searching techniques, students will be able to not only compose an initial search query, but will be able to refine and revise their search in order to locate relevant sources. In this lesson students will learn how to:Identify keywords and search termsStrategically combine search terms using Boolean operators and punctuationEvaluate search results to apply useful search refinements
Contributor: Joelle Pitts
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Searching as Strategic Exploration
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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