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University

Scholarly Inquiry and Research Methods (live or online course)

This undergraduate course, offered either live or online, combines the concepts of scholarship and information literacy in a set of five modules with instructions, guided tasks and assignments.  The course lies within an adult education Bachelor of Arts in Leadership (Trinity Western University).

Resource Type(s):

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Interdisciplinary

Type of Institution:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA

Teaching News Literacy with Process Cards

This lesson plan uses Kevin Seeber's process cards and our newly created set of process cards that focus on news sources.  In the activities using the process cards, our students were able to define and contextualize different types of information resources, including news sources.  The tranfer and apply assessment used to close the session provides an opportunity for the students to think about how they would integrate these types of information into coursework, the workplace, and their personal lives.
Discipline(s): 
Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Politics, Science, and Media

If there were a list of things I absolutely required all my students to understand before leaving my class, the relationship between mass media, politics, and science would be close to the top of the list. But there are a lot of moving parts in these relationships, so the terrain is difficult to traverse.  As one might expect of a difficult topic, there is much to read and a lot to unpack.   This pathfinder discusses how politics and our mass media system complicate the dissemination of important scientific information. 
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA

Critical Information Literacy Lesson Plan

The Critical Information Literacy Lesson Plan includes a lesson plan with a bibliography of assigned readings and discussion questions for students as well as presentation slides with main points from the lesson: definition of critical information literacy, evaluating information is a process, authority is constructed and contextual, how to evaluate information, and check the facts.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Type of Institution:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Evidence of a Life: An Introduction to Primary Sources

This is a lesson plan that centers around a 30-minute activity that gets students thinking and talking about the primary sources they create as they go about their daily lives, in order to prepare them to understand and contextualize the primary sources they encounter in historical research. They will also learn skills that can be transferred to future archival research. This works well as part I of a two-part interaction with classes. Typically, I go to their classroom for this lesson, meeting the students in a room in which they feel comfortable. They then come to the library several weeks later for a research-intensive workshop.

Resource Type(s):

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution License CC-BY

Cast Your Students as Scholars

This is a participatory, variable lesson frame ready for you to modify to suit your instruction needs. This lesson and it's variations focuses on encouraging students to see themselves as information creators and part of the scholarly conversation and can also variously include conversations about about the scholarly information cycle and/or authority depending on instruction constraints and configuration.Start with StudentScholarLessonPlan.pdf below.

Resource Type(s):

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Thinking about digital privacy, including the Rewards and Risks of Convenience

This is designed as a 75 minute lesson plan. It isn’t tied to specific course content, but can be tailored to a particular course and scaled to shorter or longer class sessions. It is designed as more of a theoretical, reflective introduction to concepts of privacy and security than as a nuts-and-bolts or tech heavy workshop, and it includes a debate activity entitled "The Rewards and Risks of Convenience." It could also be used as part 1 in a two-part workshop series in which the second focuses more on specific strategies/methods/software.

Resource Type(s):

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution License CC-BY

Meta-literacy in the online music classroom: Opportunities for instructor and librarian collaboration

Studying music in an online setting requires that students and instructors leverage digital resources and participatory technologies with understanding and intentionality. Meta-literacy, a framework promoting critical thinking and collaboration, is an inclusive approach to understanding the complexities of information use, production, and sharing in a digital environment. This chapter explores the implications of meta-literacy for the online music classroom and identifies ways in which the librarian and music instructor can collaborate to promote student self-reflection on the use, creation, and understanding of musical information or content.  
License Assigned: 
All Rights Reserved

Transformative? Integrative? Troublesome? Undergraduate Student Reflections on Information Literacy Threshold Concepts.

In this exploratory study the author asks students enrolled in a credit-bearing undergraduate research methods course to rank and evaluate the troublesome, transformative, and integrative nature of the six frames currently comprising the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. The results indicate that students have valid insights into threshold concept-based instruction, but may confuse the application with the theory. If practitioners are to embrace not only the frames, but also the spirit of the Framework, we must directly involve students in our teaching and research practices.
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License CC-BY-NC-ND

Accommodating Faculty Requests and Staying True to Your Pedagogical Ideals in the 1-Shot Information Literacy Session

Librarians are frequently asked to “teach” several databases in a 1-shot session, despite findings suggesting that such database demonstrations do not lead to optimal student outcomes. The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education highlights the concepts of metaliteracy and metacognition. This paper investigates ways in which I leveraged both of these concepts to reconcile my pedagogical ideals with an attempt to honor a faculty member’s request. By demonstrating question posing and making my own metacognitive processes transparent to students, I found that I could honor a faculty request for specific database demonstration while helping learners comprehend and see beyond the constructs of platform and format.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
MultidisciplinaryMusic
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License CC-BY-NC-ND

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