Community or Junior College

Identifying Research Questions in a Discipline

The purpose of this activity is to help students identify the types of research questions that scholars in their field are investigating in preparation for developing their own research questions. As a class, students will review multiple scholarly articles related to a topic or question, identify the research question or questions, and then discuss the characteristics of research questions that are found in the field. 

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Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Multiple Format Research or Inquiry-Based Assignment

In this assignment, students will consider how the format of the information product can impact what they are able to convey related to a topic and how their information may be received and valued. Students will investigate a topic or question and share their response in multiple formats. Formats could range from a more traditional research paper or poster to blogs, infographic, video, or even a series of Tweets. Students will be required to consider how the format(s) they have selected might impact what they can or should share and how their message may be received.

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Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Identifying Common Source Types in a Discipline

This activity is intended to help students understand the types of sources that are most commonly cited in research in a specific discipline or field. Students will review the citations from multiple relevant journal articles to identify the types of sources that are often cited. They will also be encouraged to consider why certain types of sources may be more cited than others, and what may be missing by relying primarily on certain types of sources. In addition, students will get practice in identifying the appropriate citation format for different types of sources.

Resource Type(s):

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Reflective Teaching Form

This Google Form can be used for you to track information about your instruction in one-shot and embedded information literacy sessions.  Reflecting upon your current instruction is a critical step in becoming a more effective information literacy instructor.  This form will allow you to track class information (e.g. professor, number of students, date of instruction, length of instruction), general feedback on the session (e.g. what worked well, what could have gone better), lesson planning details (e.g. which ACRL Frames were incorporated, what tools were used for assessment, when assessment was implemented), and findings from your assessment.  You can generate a Google Sheet to view all your entries, returning to past entries and reflections when you teach similar content or classes in the future to remember what aspects worked well and what you might want to change to have a more successful session.To use this form, create a copy to your Google Drive, which will allow you to tweak, add, or remove questions so that you can tailor the form for your own reflections on your teaching practice.  

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Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution License CC-BY

Using Altmetrics to Evaluate Pseudoscience News Media

These are the slides for the learning activity in the book chapter, "Teaching Undergraduates to Collate and Evaluate News Sources with Altmetrics" from the book Teaching About Fake News: Lesson Plans for Different Disciplines and Audiences. These slides include goals, definitions of original research, the scholarly conversation, altmetrics; and an in-class activity. 

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Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution License CC-BY

#ForYou: Algorithms & the Attention Economy

By the end of the #ForYou: Algorithms & the Attention Economy workshop, students will be able to:describe recommender system algorithms in order to examine how they shape individuals' online experiences through personalizationanalyze their online behaviors and subsequent ad profiles in order to reflect on how they influence how individuals encounter, perceive, & evaluate information, leading to echo chambers & political polarizationassess how their data is used to personalize their online experience in order to build algorithmic awareness & make informed, intentional choices about their information consumption**This is a standalone workshop but also scaffolds from the Penn State Berks Privacy Workshop which gives students some foundational understanding of personal data collection practices.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Information Literacy Essential Questions

In 2019, University of Minnesota Duluth librarians developed Framework-inspired essential questions to define our pedagogical agenda. Wiggins and McTighe define essential questions as “provocative questions that foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning.” These questions reveal our information literacy priorities, inform instructional design, and facilitate ongoing engagement with key ideas.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Curiosity and Asking Questions

Slides from a lesson plan focused on developing curiosity and formulating questions. Students complete a curiosity self-assessment developed by librarians at Oregon State University, discuss what curiosity looks like in their academic and personal lives, and practice developing questions about essays they've read in class using the Question Formulation Technique. The lesson was inspired by this article: Rempel, Hannah Gascho, and Anne-Marie Deitering. "Sparking-curiosity—Librarians’ role in encouraging exploration." In the Library with the Lead Pipe (2017). 

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Battling Fake Science News: The Power of Framing

This is a Power Point presentation that goes with a chapter on how to address fake science news through the use of framing. 

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Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
All Rights Reserved

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Privacy and Dx (Digital Transformation) Workshop [Peer/Professional]

This workshop engages academic librarians and higher education professionals in considering the implications of Dx (digital transformation) for privacy, especially intellectual privacy, in higher education. The session is designed to reveal how student, faculty, and staff data and metadata are collected, along with the potential implications of such data collection. Participants assess how this data is used in order to make informed, intentional choices to safeguard student and employee privacy. The session includes a guided close-reading activity to critically examine educational technology and productivity software privacy policies and terms of service. This workshop session scaffolds from the Intellectual Privacy Workshop [Peer/Professional] and Privacy Workshop [Peer/Professional].

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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