disciplinary information literacy

Librarians are frequently asked to “teach” several databases in a 1-shot session, despite findings suggesting that such database demonstrations do not lead to optimal student outcomes. The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education highlights the concepts of metaliteracy and metacognition. This paper investigates ways in which I leveraged both of these concepts to reconcile my pedagogical ideals with an attempt to honor a faculty member’s request. By demonstrating question posing and making my own metacognitive processes transparent to students, I found that I could honor a faculty request for specific database demonstration while helping learners comprehend and see beyond the constructs of platform and format.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): MultidisciplinaryMusic
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License CC-BY-NC-ND
Although much of the classical music repertory is centuries old, musicians and musicologists participate in ongoing and lively conversations about the works. New insights on old works increasingly surface thanks to technological innovations: from data-rich digital humanities projects to casual online forums where media and text can be posted and discussed. The study and performance of a musical work--even more so than text-based disciplines--should be informed by a variety of sources in a wide array of formats. As the interplay between audience and performer becomes increasingly dynamic and the potential sources for study multiply, librarians can help students negotiate this sustained, multi-format discourse. Unlike other disciplines in which there may be an uncontested answer, a musical work is subject to interpretation in unique ways. “Scholarship as Conversation” provides a framework with which musicians might begin to navigate the many considerations of how to perform or understand a piece. In order to fully appreciate the lifecycle of the work, for example, once must synthesize a variety of contemporary and historical recordings, scholarly, manuscript, and performing scores, composer biography, and other contextual information. Academic librarians must partner with music faculty to offer instruction that specifically targets and assesses student understanding of the dialogic nature of music performance and study. By helping musicians understand the many voices engaged in this dialogue, such collaborations could make a meaningful impact on the musician’s stock-in-trade: her performance.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License CC-BY-NC-ND
Initially developed in early 2018, this three-session workshop series created by instruction librarians is facilitated through the Office of Faculty Excellence at East Carolina University. Participants include classroom faculty and instructors from a wide range of disciplines and fields. Session 1 focuses on information literacy as a broad concept, asks attendees to brainstorm and develop a shared definition of information literacy, and provides a general overview of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy. Session 2 includes deeper discussion of the Framework and disciplinary culture, with participants reflecting on their own experiences moving from novice to expert in their fields inspired by Miller's Thinking Through Information Literacy In Your Discipline Worksheet. Session 3 is an applied working session in which attendees work through a backward design-based worksheet to design a learning scenario informed by a specific Frame or Frames.
Contributor: Meghan Wanucha
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
Students often feel like outsiders in their courses.  Their professors speak a different "language" and have different values.  If scholarship is a "Conversation," students need to grasp what forces and cultures drive scholars within a discipline to converse the way they do.  This slide presentation lays out the main features of disciplinary culture, the basis of all conversations.  If students can learn to "read" disciplines effectively, they will be better able to grasp the nature of conversations as they do their research.
Contributor: William Badke
Resource Type(s): Slide Deck
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
This workshet is a set of reflective questions based on the six frames which are designed for librarians or disciplinary experts to intentionally reflect on their information literacy practices.
Contributor: Sara D. Miller
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA