Professional development

A rubric which may be used to assess literacies based on the concepts in the ACRL Framework
Contributor: Shehaamah Mohamed
Resource Type(s): Assessment Material
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
College & Research Libraries News article about using the Framework to make sense of local curricula as they relate to information literacy goals and outcomes. Also discusses the Framework in light of "developmental outcomes," i.e., outcomes that are sequenced within a curriculum. 
Contributor: Donna Witek
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
"Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe, Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, shares her views about the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. She believes that that the Framework is one among many documents adopted by the Association of College and Research Libraries that academic librarians can and should use to promote information literacy. This interview was conducted in May 2016."
Contributor: Lisa Hinchliffe
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This resource includes files and links for the conference paper and slides of the presentation Rhetorical Reinventions: Rethinking Research Processes and Information Practices to Deepen our Pedagogy, presented at LOEX 2016 by Donna Witek, Mary J. Snyder Broussard, and Joel M. Burkholder. Both the slides and the paper include a detailed bibliography of related resources.Presentation/Paper Abstract:The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy offers instruction librarians an opportunity to reconsider not only how they teach but also how they think about research and information. This new thinking has the potential to reinvent instructional practices, resulting in learning that is both situated and transferable. The discipline of rhetoric can inform this effort.This presentation will consider three traditional “steps” of the research process: question formulation, information search, and source evaluation. Traditional approaches over-simplify each activity: broaden the question by including related elements or narrow it by concentrating on a specific time/area/population; follow these steps to find the “correct” number and types of sources; and evaluate information based on the presence of external characteristics.Yet when information literacy is approached rhetorically, librarians can partner with classroom faculty to teach much more meaningful and transferable information literacy knowledge, skills, and dispositions. Librarians can then guide students in the complex processes of navigating the expectations of disciplinary audiences and developing a critical self-awareness of themselves as scholarly contributors; engaging with search tools, strategies, and processes in ways that are flexible, iterative, and exploratory by design; and comprehending more fully their information sources for deeper evaluation that better meets their own rhetorical goals. In an interactive presentation, the presenters will explore how rhetoric and composition theories have the potential—with creative and strategic thinking—to work in synergy with the Framework, make information literacy more authentic and meaningful, and develop true lifelong learners.
Contributor: Donna Witek
Type of Institution: Not Applicable
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
Research Services librarians at Bucknell University collaborated on a project to make the research concepts the Framework represents more accessible to students.  This is an open educational resource in the form of digital and physical customizable posters.The research guide includes a repository for capturing ideas and suggestions for reusing, remixing, and re-conceptualizing the posters. This project opens pathways for librarians, instructional technologists, and faculty to communicate and collaborate on student-centered information literacy instruction. 
Contributor: Nancy Frazier
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
PDF of PPT Slides from Presentation at LOEX Fall Focus 2015. The Framework issues an invitation to exploration and location adaptation that is worthy of attention. This presentation accepts that invitation and provides cases studies in developing additional frames/concepts - "information social justice" and "information apprenticeship in community" - as well as a process for articulating additional frames.
Contributor: Lisa Hinchliffe
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: Not Applicable
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
The Hip Hop LibGuide is a scholarly comprehensive online resource about Hip Hop Information Literacy and the artform in general. The libguide has been developed to engage novice, intermediate, and skilled learners that are interested in learning more about the culture, social issues, and artistic components of Hip Hop.
Contributor: kYmberly Keeton
Resource Type(s): Research Guide
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This workshet is a set of reflective questions based on the six frames which are designed for librarians or disciplinary experts to intentionally reflect on their information literacy practices.
Contributor: Sara D. Miller
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
Slides from a webinar I gave on how to use a modified Backward Design process to incorporate the frames in curriculum design. 
Contributor: Sheila Stoeckel
Resource Type(s): Curriculum MapSlide Deck
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This two-sided handout provides a brief introduction to the Framework and outlines the content and how it can be used.  The expanded definition of information literacy from the Framework document is included, along with the text for all six frames.  Examples of essential questions that can be derived from the frames are also provided.  This handout can be used by librarians for conversations with faculty and for professional development with librarians.
Contributor: Sharon Mader
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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