Worksheet

What's Happening? Evaluating News in a Time of Information Overload

In this workshop, students learn about the driving forces behind fake news, reflect on how our opinions impact the way we evaluate information, and discuss and practice using criteria for evaluating news. The workshop includes a brief presentation on fake news and cognitive biases, reflection prompts for students to respond to, and an activity in which students work in groups to evaluate different news articles on a common topic.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Digital Wellness Workshop

The Penn State Berks Privacy Workshop Series focuses on privacy issues for students in the past, present, and future.  The Privacy Workshop spotlights privacy practices and concerns in the current moment; Digital Leadership explores future implications of past and current digital behaviors; Digital Shred provides tools to evaluate and mitigate the damage of past digital behaviors; and Digital Wellness focuses on privacy across the lifespan - bringing together the past, present, & future by finding a balance of technology & wellness, while aligning habits and goals.  Each workshop is grounded in theory – countering approaches that overpromise user control in the face of information asymmetries and the control paradox – and embrace students’ autonomy and agency by avoiding prescribed solutions, and instead encouraging decision-making frameworks.In the Digital Wellness Workshop, students will be able to:evaluate & articulate their digital wellness prioritiesrecognize that their relationship with technology can have real world impact on their personal wellbeing, including relationships, mental health, & professional aspirationsalign their online activity & habits within the context of their wellness goalsmodel constructive online and offline behaviors as individuals, student leaders, and future professionals

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Twitter Tag

The goal of this in-class activity is to help students relate database searching to something they already have familiarity with. This is interdisciplinary and could be adapted for any subject or database. Students will explore a timely topic on Twitter using a hashtag and note bias, tone, authority, and related hashtags before conducting a similar search on a library database or discovery tool. Students and instructors then discuss similarities and differences between both searches and their results. 

Resource Type(s):

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution License CC-BY

Digital Shred Workshop

The Penn State Berks Privacy Workshop Series focuses on privacy issues for students in the past, present, and future.  The Privacy Workshop spotlights privacy practices and concerns in the current moment; Digital Leadership explores future implications of past and current digital behaviors; Digital Shred provides tools to evaluate and mitigate the damage of past digital behaviors; and Digital Wellness focuses on privacy across the lifespan - bringing together the past, present, & future by finding a balance of technology & wellness, while aligning habits and goals.  Each workshop is grounded in theory – countering approaches that overpromise user control in the face of information asymmetries and the control paradox – and embrace students’ autonomy and agency by avoiding prescribed solutions, and instead encouraging decision-making frameworks.In the Digital Shred Workshop, students will be able to:Reflect on and describe their digital privacy priorities in order to articulate the benefits and risks of their digital dossierApply a growth mindset to critically examine their current data exhaust // digital footprint and recognize when change is neededDevelop a Personal Data Integrity Plan that makes routine the process of auditing and updating their digital dossier in alignment with their privacy valuesDescribe “digital shred” and its importance. 

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Voting Research Activity

Deciding who to vote for can be hard. On top of that, finding information about local elections can sometimes be difficult, as can be figuring out if you agree with a candidate on an issue that you don’t know too much about. This activity engages students in the civic process and in research. Students will use internet searching to find information about candidates, and database searching to find information out about an issue. 

Resource Type(s):

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution License CC-BY

Self-evaluation criteria for optimized search strategy

A list of criteria to help students check if they followed all steps to create an optimized search strategy. We used it for searches in engineering database, but it can be used in all fields. For certain fields, it might need small modifications. Aussi disponible en français dans la "Sandbox".

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific

Type of Institution:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Grille d'auto-évaluation d'une stratégie optimisée

Grille de vérification que les étudiants peuvent remplir après avoir développé une stratégie pour s'assurer d'avoir réfléchi à toutes les facettes de leur stratégie. En français (English version also available in the Sandbox)

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific

Type of Institution:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Accommodating Faculty Requests and Staying True to Your Pedagogical Ideals in the 1-Shot Information Literacy Session

Librarians are frequently asked to “teach” several databases in a 1-shot session, despite findings suggesting that such database demonstrations do not lead to optimal student outcomes. The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education highlights the concepts of metaliteracy and metacognition. This paper investigates ways in which I leveraged both of these concepts to reconcile my pedagogical ideals with an attempt to honor a faculty member’s request. By demonstrating question posing and making my own metacognitive processes transparent to students, I found that I could honor a faculty request for specific database demonstration while helping learners comprehend and see beyond the constructs of platform and format.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
MultidisciplinaryMusic
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License CC-BY-NC-ND

Thinking Critically about Information: Workshop Series

Initially developed in early 2018, this three-session workshop series created by instruction librarians is facilitated through the Office of Faculty Excellence at East Carolina University. Participants include classroom faculty and instructors from a wide range of disciplines and fields. Session 1 focuses on information literacy as a broad concept, asks attendees to brainstorm and develop a shared definition of information literacy, and provides a general overview of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy. Session 2 includes deeper discussion of the Framework and disciplinary culture, with participants reflecting on their own experiences moving from novice to expert in their fields inspired by Miller's Thinking Through Information Literacy In Your Discipline Worksheet. Session 3 is an applied working session in which attendees work through a backward design-based worksheet to design a learning scenario informed by a specific Frame or Frames.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific

Type of Institution:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution License CC-BY

Privacy Workshop

This workshop delivers an action-oriented introduction to personal data privacy designed for new college students. The session is designed to reveal the systems in place to collect and analyze online behavioral data, and to unveil the real-world consequences of online profiling in contexts like sentiment shaping, consumer preferences, employment, healthcare, personal finance, and law enforcement. In lieu of a prescriptive approach, students analyze case studies to observe how online behaviors impact real-world opportunities and reflect on the benefits and risks of technology use to develop purposeful online behaviors and habits that align with their individual values. Developing knowledge practices regarding privacy and the commodification of personal information and embodying the core library values of privacy and intellectual freedom, the workshop promotes a proactive rather than reactive approach and presents a spectrum of privacy preferences across a range of contexts in order to respect students’ autonomy and agency in personal technology use.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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