College

The Assumption Exercise

This exercise scaffolds Google and Library resources in order to help students prepare for "career conversations" with industry professionals. The presentation is designed for a business communication class in which students conduct industry research as prepartion for a strategic professional networking assignment. The assumption exercise is designed explicitly to encourage students to question their assumptions about librarians and other career professionals. Padlet is used to encourage group work and for assessment purposes.

Resource Type(s):

Discipline(s): 
Business
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA

Private Bits: Privacy, Intimacy, and Consent

This sex-positive privacy literacy workshop engages participants in exploring how sex tech impacts intimate privacy and intimate relationships. Workshop content is contextualized with the theoretical frameworks of artificial intimacies (Brooks) and consentful tech (The Consentful Tech Project) and the concept of intimate privacy (Citron) and presented through a privacy literacy lens. Participants will identify artificial intimacies in order to assess real-world examples and their impact upon intimate privacy; evaluate the privacy of digital bodies under conditions of data promiscuity using a consentful tech framework; and understand intimate privacy and the impact of technology on intimate relationships and wellbeing.The workshop is designed for a 60-minute session, but can be extended to fill the time available.Includes workshop guide, presentation slides, learning activities, inclusive pedagogy tool, and assessment instrument.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Using ChatGPT For Library Instruction: Information Creation as a Process

ChatGPT is an generative artificial intelligence chatbot released in November 2022 by OpenAI. What are the opportunities in using this tool to teach library instruction? This document highlights various ways to engage with learners in critically analyzing ChatGPT (version GPT-3) and its responses through the ACRL Frame: Information Creation as a Process. 

Resource Type(s):

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
All Rights Reserved

4-step Strategy for Evaluating Online Sources [A Learning Module]

This learning module will help students find and critically evaluate online sources for class discussions and assignments and form unbiased judgments and decisions. What is it?A five-part series learning module that takes 1.5 - 2 hrs. to completeA 4-step strategy for evaluating online sources with hands-on exercises and an infographic guideHow will it help students succeed?Develop critical source evaluation strategies.Learn to read laterally, to evaluate and track evidenceCultivate metacognitive skills and reflective practiceBuild confidence in navigating complex online information environments. Access to the Learning Module via the Google Site Link below.Please contact us if you are interested in accessing the transcripts and/or exercises & answer keys.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution License CC-BY

Strategy for Researching a Public Company

This infographic displays where to look for information and where to search for finding public company information.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Business

Type of Institution:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution License CC-BY

Scholarship is Not Neutral: Using Positionality Statements for Source Evaluation

Beginning college students often make assumptions that scholarly sources are inherently bias-free. Students may also hold the belief that if they find a source through a library database, it is automatically a useful and neutral viewpoint on a topic. These mindsets can limit students’ motivation to apply evaluation strategies beyond establishing credibility based on the author’s credentials.This lesson plan introduces the concept of positionality statements to help students understand that scholars do not leave their identities and life experiences behind when they conduct research. Students practice a new way to evaluate and understand the perspective–and limitations–that scholars bring to their research.The lesson plan is designed for first-year composition courses in which students are asked to develop a research topic based on their interests or experiences. It could be adapted for upper-level undergraduate courses in the social sciences.

Resource Type(s):

Discipline(s): 
EnglishMultidisciplinary
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

True or False: Authority is Constructed and Contextual

The goal of this activity is to help students develop a broader understanding how authority is determined and what types of sources are considered appropriate in different contexts. It is also intended to help address some of the misconceptions that students have related to the source evaluation process. 

Resource Type(s):

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Authority is Constructed and Contextual Overview

This web resource provides a brief overview of the concept Authority is Constructed and Contextual. It includes a video, a concept description, and the related knowledge practices and dispositions. 

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Lateral Reading: Respond, Review, Reflect

The goal of this activity is to help students start to think critically about the evaluation strategies that they have learned and whether they support the effective evaluation of information. Students will learn about the lateral reading strategy for evaluation and compare it to their existing evaluation process. 

Resource Type(s):

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Dark Patterns: Surveillance Capitalism and Business Ethics

This workshop engages participants in exploring corporate data collection, personal profiling, deceptive design, and data brokerage practices. Workshop content is contextualized with the theoretical frameworks of panoptic sort (Gandy), surveillance capitalism (Zuboff), and the four regulators (Lessig) and presented through a privacy and business ethics lens. Participants will learn how companies make money from data collection practices; explore how interface design can influence our choices and behaviors; and discuss business ethics regarding privacy and big data.The workshop is designed for 75-minute class sessions, but can be compressed into 60-minute sessions. Includes workshop guide, presentation slides, learning activities, and assessment instrument.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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