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Looking for an efficient way to get an overview of a body of research on your topic? A review article is a great place to start.A review article provides an analysis of the state of research on a set of related research questions. Review articles often:summarize key research findings;reference must-read articles;describe current areas of agreement as well as controversies and debates;point out gaps in knowledge and unanswered questions;suggest directions for future research.
Contributor: UCLA WIRE
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as Conversation, Searching as Strategic Exploration
You've spent weeks, months, and maybe even years working on a research project. You know why this project is important and what your next steps will be, but are you prepared to explain all of that to the next person who asks you about your research? You should take some time now and create an elevator speech to pitch in these situations.
Contributor: UCLA WIRE
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as Conversation
Literature reviews are great resources for research projects in all disciplines, presenting the key ideas in a field, pointing to must-read articles, and sugesting directions for future research. How do you go about writing one, though? This page is a collection of resources and tips for creating your own literature review.
Contributor: UCLA WIRE
Resource Type(s): Blog Post, Learning Object, Tutorial
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as Conversation
Helpful resources and a solid methodology can be key to a successful research project. We'll show you some tips for finding relevant resources, and guide you through the beginning stages of developing your methodology.By the end of this activity, you'll be able to:Locate resources relevant to your researchIdentify potential methodologies
Contributor: UCLA WIRE
Resource Type(s): Activity, Learning Object, Tutorial
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as Inquiry
When it comes to research, a little planning goes a long way. We’ll go over how to come up with a research plan and start a research notebook!By the end of this activity, you'll be able to:Create a timeline of your research goalsDocument your research progress
Contributor: UCLA WIRE
Resource Type(s): Activity, Learning Object, Tutorial
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as Process
Coming up with a good research question is essential for any research! Whether you're joining a faculty-led group or initiating an independent research project, research questions will be central to your work.By the end of this activity, you'll be able to:Generate potential research questionsRefine and improve your research questionsExplain the broader significance of your research questionIf you are joining a faculty-led project, you can still benefit from working through this tutorial. Learning about the process of generating a research question can prepare you for your future...
Contributor: UCLA WIRE
Resource Type(s): Activity, Learning Object, Tutorial
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as Inquiry, Scholarship as Conversation
Once you've decided to do research, the next step is to make a list of research opportunities that interest you!By the end of this activity, you'll be able to:Identify your research interestsIdentify potential mentors and research projectsMake a list of potential mentors and research projectsThis workshop was created by UCLA's WI+RE team.
Contributor: UCLA WIRE
Resource Type(s): Activity, Learning Object, Tutorial
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as Inquiry, Scholarship as Conversation
Before getting started with research, it's important to know the difference between faculty- and student-led projects, as well as how to earn course credit for your research.By the end of this activity, you'll be able to:Identify benefits of faculty- and student-led research projectsIdentify differences between SRP 99 and Departmental 195-199.
Contributor: UCLA WIRE
Resource Type(s): Activity, Learning Object, Tutorial
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as Process
Anyone can get started with research—all it takes is curiosity and persistence!By the end of this activity, you'll be able to:Describe the nature of researchList reasons to do researchArticulate your goals for doing researchThis workshop was created by UCLA's WI+RE team.
Contributor: UCLA WIRE
Resource Type(s): Activity, Learning Object, Tutorial
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as Inquiry, Scholarship as Conversation
Congratulations! You've spent weeks, months, and maybe even years working on a research project that you're proud of. Now you will need to present your research and its significance in a concise manner. You will learn how to share your research in two formats: the research abstract, and the elevator speech.By the end of this workshop, you'll be able to:Write a research abstractDeliver an effective elevator speech about your research project
Contributor: UCLA WIRE
Resource Type(s): Activity, Learning Object, Tutorial
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as Conversation

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