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In this exploratory study the author asks students enrolled in a credit-bearing undergraduate research methods course to rank and evaluate the troublesome, transformative, and integrative nature of the six frames currently comprising the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. The results indicate that students have valid insights into threshold concept-based instruction, but may confuse the application with the theory. If practitioners are to embrace not only the frames, but also the spirit of the Framework, we must directly involve students in our teaching and research...
Contributor: Rachel Scott
This rubric was developed to assess students' written reflections about primary source materials they encountered in class.  Developed by Meggan Press and Meg Meiman at Indiana University Libraries in Bloomington, this rubric is designed for instructors to gauge students' primary source literacy skills for short- or long-form written projects.  It was adapted from the SAA/RBMS Guidelines for Primary Source Literacy and the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy.
Contributor: Meg Meiman
Resource Type(s): Assessment Material, Rubric
Updated Version, please download this one!  This infographic helps students figure out more information about peer-reviewed articles, including types of secondary articles like meta-analysis and meta-synethesis.  This map gives more information and helps to point them in the right direction, especially those doing literature reviews in the sciences.  
Contributor: Samantha Kennedy
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
A discussion and overview of the following ideasWhy we see things differently.Why we don’t like to be wrong.Why it is dangerous to question authority.Where we got the letter A.The morbidity of Puritan children’s books.How culture and community impact information.The origin of the political parties in America.How information is dangerous and can be used to disrupt or preserve a social order. take note of the following terms:cognitive dissonanceconfirmation biasdisconfirmation biasoppositional media hostilitypropagandatop-down information systemsbottom-up information systemspublic...
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog Post, Lesson Plan
Similar to my general "research snake" this one is specficially for history student searching for history resources, primary and secondary.  This is a visual resource you can use to show students how to start research and the steps they should follow along the way.  If you have any questions, please feel free to email me at samkennedy@gmail.com
Contributor: Samantha Kennedy
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
This is a visual resource you can use to show students how to start research and the steps they should follow along the way.  This is applicable to all discplines.  If you have any questions, please feel free to email me at samkennedy@gmail.com
Contributor: Samantha Kennedy
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
This lesson starts with a simple question: "Who knows the most about (topic of your choice)?" In my experience doing this lesson with first year students, a majority of students will identify personal experience as knowing the "most" at the outset. It is common for them to say something along the lines of: No one understands what it’s like to be homeless more than someone who has been through it. Starting from that firm conviction, this lesson is designed to help students think about different ways of “knowing” and what secondary sources (particularly scholarly) are able to accomplish in...
Contributor: Jennifer Hasse
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
A one-shot or seminar class on fake news tied to source evaluation. Examination of the factors at play in the creation of misinformation; insight into how to select sources; tools and strategies for evalutating content of stories, authors, and news outlets.
Contributor: Jennifer Hasse
Resource Type(s): Activity, Lesson Plan
Comme une fiche-synthèse à remettre à la fin d'un atelier sur l'évaluation des sources. Encore mieux : dans l'atelier, insérez volontairement une erreur et en début d'atelier demandez aux étudiants de la repérer. À la fin de l'atelier, remettez la seule fiche-synthèse plastifiée au participant qui l'a trouvé en premier, les autres participants ont la version papier simple.Peut servir à évaluer le document le plus faible parmi la bibliographie d'un travail, d'un mémoire, d'une thèse; ou dans le syllabus d'un professeur ; ou dans la bibliographie d'une source (article ou livre).Gamified summary...
Contributor: Pascal Martinolli
Resource Type(s): Assessment Material, Worksheet

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