Course-level

Updated Version, please download this one!  This infographic helps students figure out more information about peer-reviewed articles, including types of secondary articles like meta-analysis and meta-synethesis.  This map gives more information and helps to point them in the right direction, especially those doing literature reviews in the sciences.  
Contributor: Samantha Kennedy
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
A discussion and overview of the following ideasWhy we see things differently.Why we don’t like to be wrong.Why it is dangerous to question authority.Where we got the letter A.The morbidity of Puritan children’s books.How culture and community impact information.The origin of the political parties in America.How information is dangerous and can be used to disrupt or preserve a social order. take note of the following terms:cognitive dissonanceconfirmation biasdisconfirmation biasoppositional media hostilitypropagandatop-down information systemsbottom-up information systemspublic spheresocial responsibility theory of journalismobjectivitythe Fairness DoctrineNet Neutrality 
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog PostLesson Plan
Scope: Course-level
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This infographic helps students figure out more information about peer-reviewed articles, including types of secondary articles like meta-analysis and meta-synethesis.  This map gives more information and helps to point them in the right direction, especially those doing literature reviews in the sciences.  
Contributor: Samantha Kennedy
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
Similar to my general "research snake" this one is specficially for history student searching for history resources, primary and secondary.  This is a visual resource you can use to show students how to start research and the steps they should follow along the way.  If you have any questions, please feel free to email me at samkennedy@gmail.com
Contributor: Samantha Kennedy
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Discipline(s): History
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This is a visual resource you can use to show students how to start research and the steps they should follow along the way.  This is applicable to all discplines.  If you have any questions, please feel free to email me at samkennedy@gmail.com
Contributor: Samantha Kennedy
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This chart is the result of a partnership between campus Writing Coordinator,  First Year Seminar Coordinator, and myself (Information Literacy Coordinator) to create a customizable assignment structure for our first year seminar class. It offers a template for integrating information literacy into the course and links threshold concepts of writing composition to the Framework. Composition threshold concepts are those outlined by Kassner and Wardle (2015) Naming What We Know: Threshold Concepts of Writing Studies.
Contributor: Jennifer Hasse
Resource Type(s): Instruction Program Material
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This lesson asks students to create their own visual representations of the research process and introduces them to the idea of research as a circular process rather than linear. Learning Outcomes: Students understand research as a non-linear process of explorationStudents acquire strategies for moving through the research process effectively Students plan for successful completion of research assignments
Contributor: Jennifer Hasse
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as InquirySearching as Strategic Exploration
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This lesson starts with a simple question: "Who knows the most about (topic of your choice)?" In my experience doing this lesson with first year students, a majority of students will identify personal experience as knowing the "most" at the outset. It is common for them to say something along the lines of: No one understands what it’s like to be homeless more than someone who has been through it. Starting from that firm conviction, this lesson is designed to help students think about different ways of “knowing” and what secondary sources (particularly scholarly) are able to accomplish in providing analysis, context, and scope. Learning outcomes: Students will be able to articulate multiple ways in which authority can be ascribed [Authority is Constructed and Contextual]Students will be able to identify primary and secondary sources / scholarly and popular sources and how they are linked to each other [Scholarship is Conversation]Students will seek a variety of source formats and perspectives in their own work [Information has value]
Contributor: Jennifer Hasse
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
A one-shot or seminar class on fake news tied to source evaluation. Examination of the factors at play in the creation of misinformation; insight into how to select sources; tools and strategies for evalutating content of stories, authors, and news outlets.
Contributor: Jennifer Hasse
Resource Type(s): ActivityLesson Plan
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved

Pages