Lesson Plan

A discussion and overview of the following ideasWhy we see things differently.Why we don’t like to be wrong.Why it is dangerous to question authority.Where we got the letter A.The morbidity of Puritan children’s books.How culture and community impact information.The origin of the political parties in America.How information is dangerous and can be used to disrupt or preserve a social order. take note of the following terms:cognitive dissonanceconfirmation biasdisconfirmation biasoppositional media hostilitypropagandatop-down information systemsbottom-up information systemspublic spheresocial responsibility theory of journalismobjectivitythe Fairness DoctrineNet Neutrality 
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog PostLesson Plan
Scope: Course-level
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This lesson asks students to create their own visual representations of the research process and introduces them to the idea of research as a circular process rather than linear. Learning Outcomes: Students understand research as a non-linear process of explorationStudents acquire strategies for moving through the research process effectively Students plan for successful completion of research assignments
Contributor: Jennifer Hasse
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as InquirySearching as Strategic Exploration
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This lesson starts with a simple question: "Who knows the most about (topic of your choice)?" In my experience doing this lesson with first year students, a majority of students will identify personal experience as knowing the "most" at the outset. It is common for them to say something along the lines of: No one understands what it’s like to be homeless more than someone who has been through it. Starting from that firm conviction, this lesson is designed to help students think about different ways of “knowing” and what secondary sources (particularly scholarly) are able to accomplish in providing analysis, context, and scope. Learning outcomes: Students will be able to articulate multiple ways in which authority can be ascribed [Authority is Constructed and Contextual]Students will be able to identify primary and secondary sources / scholarly and popular sources and how they are linked to each other [Scholarship is Conversation]Students will seek a variety of source formats and perspectives in their own work [Information has value]
Contributor: Jennifer Hasse
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
A one-shot or seminar class on fake news tied to source evaluation. Examination of the factors at play in the creation of misinformation; insight into how to select sources; tools and strategies for evalutating content of stories, authors, and news outlets.
Contributor: Jennifer Hasse
Resource Type(s): ActivityLesson Plan
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
Une feuille d'autoévaluation pour suivre les apprentissages en compétences informationnelles acquises sur le moyen ou le long terme. Elle est ludifiée avec des éléments de mesure de soi, de badge et d'identité de jeune chercheur.A scholarly character sheet for self-assessment about information literacy skills - gamification around quantified self, badging and young researcher identity.
Contributor: Pascal Martinolli
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Tags: WILU2018
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This template gives space to outline an Information Literacy session, allowing a department to create a more cohesive program, or a single librarian to maintain an organized sense of their own sessions.This single page template gives space for teaching and learning activities, applying a frame, tools used for the session, assesment techniques used, time taken, as well as assigning it to a course and instructor.
Contributor: Hanna Primeau
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
In this activity, students think metacognitively as they search to work out strategies for navigating the search process.  In the process, they use Google Docs to collaboratively produce a Search Tips sheet which the whole class can refer back to.  
Contributor: Heather Beirne
Resource Type(s): ActivityLesson PlanWorksheet
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
The following activity is meant to demonstrate the concepts of authorship and authority to first year writing students. Students will use their prior knowledge and everyday experiences with subpar information to draw parallels between evaluating academic and popular sources.
Contributor: Heather Beirne
Resource Type(s): ActivityLesson Plan
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
EDU 100 / 300: Contexts of Education is a required course in the undergraduate Education program at the University of Alberta; EDU 300 is for after degree students. Students submit a research paper (library assignment) related to a current educational issue in Canada. For this assignment they need to locate at least four different sources: two sources must be articles from peer-reviewed academic journals, the remaining two sources may include additional peer-reviewed articles, books, book chapters, professional education-related journals (trade journals), newspaper articles, videos, etc. The original lesson plan was designed by Debbie Feisst and was taught with some modifications by various librarians at the H.T. Coutts Education Library.  Although emphasis is on the following two frames: Authority is Constructed and Contextual, Information Creation as a process, a mapping document has been included to illustrate where other frames are addressed throughout the lesson.
Contributor: Kim Frail
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Discipline(s): Education
Type of Institution: University
Scope: Course-level
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
As part of a collaboration with Claire Holmes and Lisa Sweeney at Towson University's Albert S. Cook Library, I infused our lesson plan for ISTC 301/501 with ACRL Framework Concepts. The original lesson plan was conceived of by Holmes and Sweeney as a way to integreate information literacy instruction concepts for teachers into ISTC 301 and SPED 413 in our College of Education. The attached slides illustrate one way to include information literacy instruction, the ACRL Framework, and teaching standards in college-level instruction. The aim for this lesson plan was to encourage College of Education students to include information literacy instruction in their lesson plans at the k-12 level so that students matriculating from their schools would be familiar with these crucial theories before arriving in higher education or the workplace.The lesson was structured as follows:Introduce digital citizenship and information literacy conceptsModel lesson planning using library resourcesCreate lesson plans using Common Core State StandardsStudents were encouraged to reflect on their own experiences as researchers, apply their learned research skills to their k-12 classrooms, use library resources to enhance their lesson plan creation, create a lesson plan in smaller groups to share with the classroom, incorporate lexile levels from multiple grade levels, and use open-source lesson plan materials focused on information literacy.Discussions about "Scholarship as a Conversation" and "Searching as Strategic Exploration" were included to highlight the importance of authority and of using sources from a variety of locations. 
Contributor: Sarah Gilchrist
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Discipline(s): Education
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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