College-level

”Evidence Based Optometry" is an interactive research guide that supports the Clinical Reasoning classes at the New England College of Optometry. There are four sections to the tutorial: ask, acquire, appraise and apply. These sections align with the four steps of evidence-based medicine. The research guide emphasizes the “Authority is Constructed and Contextual” frame by including a health information-focused CRAAP test and the evidence pyramid. It also emphasizes the “Research as Inquiry” frame as students learn how to craft background and foreground questions.
Contributor: Melissa Lydston
Resource Type(s): Tutorial
Discipline(s): Health
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License CC-BY-NC-ND
An explanation of different kinds of authority that students might recognize in a piece of information accompanied by a list of articles about global warming that appeal to, invoke, or otherwise discuss these authorities.  Students should skim one or more of the articles, answer some questions about them, and discuss their ideas with their peers.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Discipline(s): InterdisciplinaryOther
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
Four short screencasts under 90 seconds about the role of metacognition in information literacy instruction.
Contributor: Susan Ariew
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as Inquiry
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This document lists the outcomes, performance indicators, and dispositions developed for the Threshold Achievement Test for Information Literacy (TATIL). This test has four modules inspired by the six frames of the Framework: Evaluating Process & Authority; Strategic Searching; Research & Scholarship; and The Value of Information. 
Contributor: Carolyn Radcliff
Resource Type(s): Learning Outcomes List
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
Laney College Library Assessment Plan 2017-20. Instruction outcomes are aligned with ACRL Framework and checklist used on orientation request form.
Contributor: Evelyn Lord
Resource Type(s): Assessment Material
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
Type of Institution: Community or Junior College
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
Laney College Library 2017-20 Service and Instruction Outcomes, developed May 2017.  Instruction outcomes aligned with ACRL Framework.
Contributor: Evelyn Lord
Resource Type(s): Learning Outcomes List
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
Type of Institution: Community or Junior College
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This matrix was developed as a result of conversations with the writing department faculty, FYS coordinator, and general education committee.  I condensed the language of the Framework as well as the learner/dispositions, and led the workshop with faculty and librarians on how to begin to look at their specific courses as well as across the program on how they might incorporate the FW at each level, for each course, and drill down to the classroom instruction, partnering with the librarian on activities, assessment, and outcomes. More work and a journal publication about this process and method TBD. Please contact me (rhondahuisman@gmail.com) or PM on Twitter if you have questions, discussion, etc.Pilot exercise presented at Marian University Faculty Con (May, 2017)
Contributor: Rhonda Huisman
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
I wrote "How Information Works:ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Lay Language" for a faculty workshop we held at Ohio University called, "Reimagining the Research Project."  Later, the Learner-Centered Teaching team took the "Actions" and/or "Attitudes" from that restatement and wrote rubrics for each frame. We chose just one Action or Attitude per frame to rubric-ize. These are still in draft form. Our intention here is to greatly simplify the language so faculty can more easily understand our purpose. I have linked to our page, where several versions can be accessed: simple (b/w), color handout, long version with attitudes and  actions from novice to expert, and draft rubrics.  
Contributor: sherri saines
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This LibGuide is the result of our Reference Team's year-long project to create a new curriculum for our Instruction program, based on the Framework. Our project plan and documentation of our workflow is also available by request.MacPhaidin Library’s information skills curriculum is designed to teach students increasingly sophisticated research strategies throughout their Stonehill careers and to produce graduates who are adept at articulating their information needs, finding the resources to meet them, and using that data ethically to create new knowledge.By the time they graduate, students who participate in the full information skills curriculum can:Define their information needIdentify appropriate source types and research tools to meet their information needEvaluate information to determine its validity, accuracy, authority, timeliness and biasSynthesize information from research with existing understanding in order to create new knowledgeIdentify the legal, ethical, economic and social issues related to the use of information and recognize relevant intellectual property lawsUsing the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education, we’ve created a curriculum that identifies specific learning goals for the different stages of students’ studies. The stages focus on a variety of core concepts ranging from the simple – the iterative nature of searching - to the more complex – the impact of context on the value of information. The framework is designed to enhance student's information skills through faculty-librarian collaboration. This curriculum provides a template faculty and librarians can use to collaboratively craft instruction that will improve students’ information skills and, thereby, result in better work. This guide introduces our mission statement, curriculum and learning outcomes, and provides examples of the many ways librarians can assist you as your students develop their skills.
Contributor: Elizabeth Chase
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: College
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
The Inform Your Thinking video series introduces students to the frames of the ACRL Framework in an easy-to-understand manner by using conversational tone, approachable peer hosts, relatable comparisons, and eye-catching graphics. This video introduces students to the Searching as Strategic Exploration frame by pushing students to think about their information need and the scope of their search. Students will examine parameters for when and where to perform searches, as well as how they should formulate and refine their search terms.
Contributor: Cristina Colquhoun
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Searching as Strategic Exploration
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

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