Assignment Prompt

In this activity, students work in groups to craft a response to a presidential tweet from an assigned perspective (e.g. right or left leaning news source). In doing so, they are required to find, evaluate, and effectively use information to make a case. Unlike a research paper, which aspires to be neutral or unbiased, this activity asks students to respond to a tweet from a particular perspective, with a particular bias, requiring them to engage with their sources in a new way. The activity is followed by a discussion of students' interactions with the information they found and presented. 
Contributor: Faith Rusk
Resource Type(s): ActivityAssignment Prompt
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
The Critical Information Literacy Lesson Plan includes a lesson plan with a bibliography of assigned readings and discussion questions for students as well as presentation slides with main points from the lesson: definition of critical information literacy, evaluating information is a process, authority is constructed and contextual, how to evaluate information, and check the facts.
Contributor: Latia Ward
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
Studying music in an online setting requires that students and instructors leverage digital resources and participatory technologies with understanding and intentionality. Meta-literacy, a framework promoting critical thinking and collaboration, is an inclusive approach to understanding the complexities of information use, production, and sharing in a digital environment. This chapter explores the implications of meta-literacy for the online music classroom and identifies ways in which the librarian and music instructor can collaborate to promote student self-reflection on the use, creation, and understanding of musical information or content.  
Contributor: Rachel Scott
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
Librarians are frequently asked to “teach” several databases in a 1-shot session, despite findings suggesting that such database demonstrations do not lead to optimal student outcomes. The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education highlights the concepts of metaliteracy and metacognition. This paper investigates ways in which I leveraged both of these concepts to reconcile my pedagogical ideals with an attempt to honor a faculty member’s request. By demonstrating question posing and making my own metacognitive processes transparent to students, I found that I could honor a faculty request for specific database demonstration while helping learners comprehend and see beyond the constructs of platform and format.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): MultidisciplinaryMusic
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License CC-BY-NC-ND
Although much of the classical music repertory is centuries old, musicians and musicologists participate in ongoing and lively conversations about the works. New insights on old works increasingly surface thanks to technological innovations: from data-rich digital humanities projects to casual online forums where media and text can be posted and discussed. The study and performance of a musical work--even more so than text-based disciplines--should be informed by a variety of sources in a wide array of formats. As the interplay between audience and performer becomes increasingly dynamic and the potential sources for study multiply, librarians can help students negotiate this sustained, multi-format discourse. Unlike other disciplines in which there may be an uncontested answer, a musical work is subject to interpretation in unique ways. “Scholarship as Conversation” provides a framework with which musicians might begin to navigate the many considerations of how to perform or understand a piece. In order to fully appreciate the lifecycle of the work, for example, once must synthesize a variety of contemporary and historical recordings, scholarly, manuscript, and performing scores, composer biography, and other contextual information. Academic librarians must partner with music faculty to offer instruction that specifically targets and assesses student understanding of the dialogic nature of music performance and study. By helping musicians understand the many voices engaged in this dialogue, such collaborations could make a meaningful impact on the musician’s stock-in-trade: her performance.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License CC-BY-NC-ND
The credit-bearing classroom provides librarians with expanded opportunities to connect with students as teachers, mentors, and advocates. Both the content and approach of one-shot sessions are often driven by faculty requests for resource-based instruction. Librarians teaching credit-bearing classes do not face the same constraints on their time with students or limitations on instructional content. Accordingly, librarians in credit-bearing settings can go beyond demonstrating databases or teaching discrete skills to engage students in learning research concepts and to advocate for information- related social justice issues. One such advocacy issue is copyleft, a movement responding to the constraints of traditional copyright by allowing the licensed work to be used, modified, and distributed as determined by the work’s creator. By introducing students to the copyleft movement, librarians can encourage students to make their works more freely available and to engage in the conversation of scholarship. This chapter presents a case study of a research methods course in which students created and embedded Creative Commons licenses in digital platforms in order to encourage learners to critically evaluate the production and value of information.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has Value
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License CC-BY-NC-ND
These .pdfs offer students examples of three different search strategies.  Students can then construct their own on the 2nd page.  These exercises can be used to assess student understnading of keywords and Boolean operators.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as InquirySearching as Strategic Exploration
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
Comment envoyer une minorité d'étudiants surmotivés sur des objectifs pédagogiques intégrés et connexes dont le parcours est structuré ?1) Faire une courte introduction engageante (15min.) 2) Identifier la minorité surmotivée et leur distribuer un parcours. 3) Assurer une supervision mininal avec un suivi distant et ponctuel au besoin.Avec 2 exemples de parcours: une auto-initiation en 5 niveaux pour contribuer à Wikipédia; et un programme de 12 semaines pour démarrer un blogue sur un sujet de recherche.How to get the few really motivated students involved? By asking them to fulfil « side-quests » learning activities in a structured itinerary : 1) Present a short but engaging initiation [sur quoi?] (15 min.) ;2) After identifying the motivated students, give them a formal checklist [pour quoi?];3) If needed, provide minimum mentoring and follow-upHere are two examples : 5-steps self-initiation on how to contribute to Wikipedia and 12-weeks program to start a blog on research topic.
Contributor: Pascal Martinolli
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This template gives space to outline an Information Literacy session, allowing a department to create a more cohesive program, or a single librarian to maintain an organized sense of their own sessions.This single page template gives space for teaching and learning activities, applying a frame, tools used for the session, assesment techniques used, time taken, as well as assigning it to a course and instructor.
Contributor: Hanna Primeau
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
An explanation of different kinds of authority that students might recognize in a piece of information accompanied by a list of articles about global warming that appeal to, invoke, or otherwise discuss these authorities.  Students should skim one or more of the articles, answer some questions about them, and discuss their ideas with their peers.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Discipline(s): InterdisciplinaryOther
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY

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