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This template gives space to outline an Information Literacy session, allowing a department to create a more cohesive program, or a single librarian to maintain an organized sense of their own sessions.This single page template gives space for teaching and learning activities, applying a frame, tools used for the session, assesment techniques used, time taken, as well as assigning it to a course and instructor.
Contributor: Hanna Primeau
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
Paper discussing a proposal for an information fluency initiative at the University of North Texas (UNT) Libraries.
Contributor: Greg Hardin
Resource Type(s): PublicationWhite PaperOther
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
I wrote "How Information Works:ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Lay Language" for a faculty workshop we held at Ohio University called, "Reimagining the Research Assignment."  Later, the Learner-Centered Teaching team took the "Actions" and/or "Attitudes" from that restatement and wrote "Gateway Scales:" almost-rubrics for each frame.  Our intention here is to greatly simplify the language so faculty can more easily understand our purpose. I have linked to our page, where several versions can be accessed: simple (b/w), color handout, long color version with attitudes and actions from novice to expert.  I have also uploaded PDFs of both documents.
Contributor: sherri saines
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This LibGuide is the result of our Reference Team's year-long project to create a new curriculum for our Instruction program, based on the Framework. Our project plan and documentation of our workflow is also available by request.MacPhaidin Library’s information skills curriculum is designed to teach students increasingly sophisticated research strategies throughout their Stonehill careers and to produce graduates who are adept at articulating their information needs, finding the resources to meet them, and using that data ethically to create new knowledge.By the time they graduate, students who participate in the full information skills curriculum can:Define their information needIdentify appropriate source types and research tools to meet their information needEvaluate information to determine its validity, accuracy, authority, timeliness and biasSynthesize information from research with existing understanding in order to create new knowledgeIdentify the legal, ethical, economic and social issues related to the use of information and recognize relevant intellectual property lawsUsing the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education, we’ve created a curriculum that identifies specific learning goals for the different stages of students’ studies. The stages focus on a variety of core concepts ranging from the simple – the iterative nature of searching - to the more complex – the impact of context on the value of information. The framework is designed to enhance student's information skills through faculty-librarian collaboration. This curriculum provides a template faculty and librarians can use to collaboratively craft instruction that will improve students’ information skills and, thereby, result in better work. This guide introduces our mission statement, curriculum and learning outcomes, and provides examples of the many ways librarians can assist you as your students develop their skills.
Contributor: Elizabeth Chase
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: College
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
PDF of PPT Slides from Presentation at LOEX Fall Focus 2015. The Framework issues an invitation to exploration and location adaptation that is worthy of attention. This presentation accepts that invitation and provides cases studies in developing additional frames/concepts - "information social justice" and "information apprenticeship in community" - as well as a process for articulating additional frames.
Contributor: Lisa Hinchliffe
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: Not Applicable
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved