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This workshop delivers an action-oriented introduction to personal data privacy designed for new college students. The session is designed to reveal the systems in place to collect and analyze online behavioral data, and to unveil the real-world consequences of online profiling in contexts like sentiment shaping, consumer preferences, employment, healthcare, personal finance, and law enforcement. In lieu of a prescriptive approach, students analyze case studies to observe how online behaviors impact real-world opportunities and reflect on the benefits and risks of technology use to develop purposeful online behaviors and habits that align with their individual values. Developing knowledge practices regarding privacy and the commodification of personal information and embodying the core library values of privacy and intellectual freedom, the workshop promotes a proactive rather than reactive approach and presents a spectrum of privacy preferences across a range of contexts in order to respect students’ autonomy and agency in personal technology use.
Contributor: Alexandria Chisholm
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has Value
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
Updated Version, please download this one!  This infographic helps students figure out more information about peer-reviewed articles, including types of secondary articles like meta-analysis and meta-synethesis.  This map gives more information and helps to point them in the right direction, especially those doing literature reviews in the sciences.  
Contributor: Samantha Kennedy
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This infographic helps students figure out more information about peer-reviewed articles, including types of secondary articles like meta-analysis and meta-synethesis.  This map gives more information and helps to point them in the right direction, especially those doing literature reviews in the sciences.  
Contributor: Samantha Kennedy
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
An explanation of different kinds of authority that students might recognize in a piece of information accompanied by a list of articles about global warming that appeal to, invoke, or otherwise discuss these authorities.  Students should skim one or more of the articles, answer some questions about them, and discuss their ideas with their peers.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Discipline(s): InterdisciplinaryOther
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This exercise gives students a model for approaching a research task, beginning with general information and ending with more in-depth sources. Discussion can focus on research as inquiry, research as strategic exploration, and the context and construction of authority. Students are required to cite their sources using both MLA and APA.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Assignment Prompt
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
Students will be exposed to various entry points of a sustainability topic in various formats.This lesson is to serve as an introduction to different types of sources that can be used to learn about and research topics - including multimedia sources, Internet, and scholarly articles - and the attributes of different kinds of sources. They will take notes as they hear/read the sources using Elements of Thought (based on Paul-Elder's critical thinking model) and reflect in small groups to evaluate the credibility of the sources and what next steps they will take to further research. This is a face-to-face, in-class activity. The duration of the in-class activities for this lesson is approximately 60-75 minutes. Length and difficulty of content should be considered when selecting the examples.It is highly adaptable for content and theme although it was designed, originally, for a faculty member whose first-year composition class is themed around sustainability. Instructor will select various source types to explore a single topic. Possible sustainability-themed examples include: food deserts, clean water in the US, bee colony collapse, etc.Source types should include:One short-form video product (I.e. TED Talk, video essay, documentary clip, recorded speech, or other topical video informational product)One published essay, opinion editorial, or commentaryOne informative (unbiased) article or reference entry.
Contributor: Cristy Moran
Resource Type(s): Activity
Discipline(s): InterdisciplinaryOther
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This hands-on activity was piloted as part of a teach-in on fake news at Purchase College, SUNY. To convey the idea that “fake news” exists on a continuum, we did a pin-the-tail-on-the-donkey activity using a blank version of Vanessa Otero’s Media Bias chart. The chart is a useful tool for showing the nuances between nonfactual, biased, and inflammatory news sources. Participants are asked to research a news media organization and decide where to place it on the chart, then compare their choices to Otero's original infographic. Two groups can also compare their choices to each other. The ensuing discussion fits nicely with the ACRL Threshold Concept: “Authority is constructed and contextual” and can relate to "Research as Inquiry" or "Information as Value" as well, if economic factors related to the press and clickbait websites are discussed. The concept of a source being on a spectrum of “complex vs. clickbait” adds an additional layer of complexity for students who are used to focusing on binaries such as: liberal vs. conservative or “trustworthy vs. fake.” The details of how to implement this activity as well as copies of Otero's chart are attached. (P.S. An updated version of the chart was created in Fall 2017 adding more nuance along the "complexity" axis and removing some of the "PG-13" or "sassy" language. See attached PDFs).
Contributor: Darcy Gervasio
Discipline(s): InterdisciplinaryOther
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This list of locally developed, class-level learning outcomes are part of an ongoing project to develop shared resources among the MVCC librarians to encourage the integration of the Framework into our practice. This resource identifies a Frame and Knowledge Practice, the related local learning outcome, and in many cases, a lesson plan, idea, or activity. We are in the process of adding assessment ideas to this list, and we will continue to develop and add learning outcomes related to each of the Frames.
Contributor: Tish Hayes
Resource Type(s): Learning Outcomes List
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Other
Type of Institution: Community or Junior College
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
This is a chart that maps The University of Scranton Weinberg Memorial Library's program-level information literacy student learning outcomes to the six frames in the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, last updated August 10, 2016. Materials are licensed CC-BY-NC.
Contributor: Donna Witek
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Other
Type of Institution: CollegeUniversity
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC