Assessment Material

Laney College Library Assessment Plan 2017-20. Instruction outcomes are aligned with ACRL Framework and checklist used on orientation request form.
Contributor: Evelyn Lord
Resource Type(s): Assessment Material
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
Type of Institution: Community or Junior College
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
The three rubrics here were designed for an introductory course for English majors, but the ways in which the ACRL Framework is used could be replicated for any discipline and could be extended to program assessment.  Each rubric addresses one ARCL Frame.  The ACRL "dispositions" are treated as desired learning outcomes; the ACRL "knowledge practices" play the role of descriptors.  The rubric is intended to be used not simply on a student-produced project or activity, but on a project and a structured student reflection taken together.
Contributor: Terry Riley
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This chapter from Classroom Assessment Techniques for Librarians, by Melissa Bowles-Terry and Cassandra Kvenild, uses three assessment techniques to help librarians assess students’ skill in synthesis and creative thinking. 
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This chapter from the Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook, edited by Nicole Pagowsky and Kelly McElroy and written by Rachel Gammons, demonstrates a critical assessment activity that offers an opportunity to reflect on the lived reality of learners and make purposeful and informed adjustments to teaching.
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This resource is an online guide to developing and assessing student learning outcomes based on the Framework.  The guide includes:A document mapping the Standards to the Framework.A brief discussion of assessment.An introduction to each frame.Sample outcomes for multiple choice questions, with example questions.Sample outcomes for short assignments, with examples of potential assignments.Sample outcomes for research assignments, with sample rubrics.A select annotated bibliography.
Contributor: Rachel McMullin
Resource Type(s): Assessment Material
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Tags: Assessment
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This is a lesson plan, files, and assessment information for an upper level biology class.  It is in two parts, finding genetic information online and citing images.  It follows a flipped model with pre-class activities required.  The second activity on citing images was created using a Process Orientated Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) framework.  Although this activity is specific to CSE style, the activity could be adapted to any citation style.  
Contributor: Michelle Price
Discipline(s): Biology
Type of Institution: CollegeUniversity
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
A rubric which may be used to assess literacies based on the concepts in the ACRL Framework
Contributor: Shehaamah Mohamed
Resource Type(s): Assessment Material
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
Discovery tools are great at revealing the variety of sources available to researchers. This one-shot lesson plan makes use of discovery platform facets and features to show students the range of content available. Students will also explore and evaluate how the available information sources differ from each other. The lesson may be more appropriate for upper-level students who have database experience and a basic understanding of what research looks like within their disciplines.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
Exploratory study in two parts.  Part one addresses the question of whether or not undergraduate students can understand the language and concepts in this document. By presenting student responses to pretest questions recorded at the beginning of a semester-long research methods course, this article shows that students can, even on first impression, begin to make sense of the complexity and richness found in the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education.  Survey questions and complete student responses are included.Part two compares student pretest and posttest responses conducted at the beginning and end of a semester-long research methods course to measure the evolution of undergraduate students’ comprehension of information literacy concepts aspresented in the Frames.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Type of Institution: CollegeUniversity
Scope: Course-level
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
The Citations lesson is mapped to Information has Value and Scholarship as Conversation Frames. It discusses why citations are a foundation of scholarly communication and the basic components of a citation. Through infographics and videos, students will learn the differences between paraphrasing, summarizing and quoting.
Contributor: Joelle Pitts
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has ValueScholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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