bias

A discussion and overview of the following ideasWhy we see things differently.Why we don’t like to be wrong.Why it is dangerous to question authority.Where we got the letter A.The morbidity of Puritan children’s books.How culture and community impact information.The origin of the political parties in America.How information is dangerous and can be used to disrupt or preserve a social order. take note of the following terms:cognitive dissonanceconfirmation biasdisconfirmation biasoppositional media hostilitypropagandatop-down information systemsbottom-up information systemspublic spheresocial responsibility theory of journalismobjectivitythe Fairness DoctrineNet Neutrality 
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog PostLesson Plan
Scope: Course-level
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This hands-on activity was piloted as part of a teach-in on fake news at Purchase College, SUNY. To convey the idea that “fake news” exists on a continuum, we did a pin-the-tail-on-the-donkey activity using a blank version of Vanessa Otero’s Media Bias chart. The chart is a useful tool for showing the nuances between nonfactual, biased, and inflammatory news sources. Participants are asked to research a news media organization and decide where to place it on the chart, then compare their choices to Otero's original infographic. Two groups can also compare their choices to each other. The ensuing discussion fits nicely with the ACRL Threshold Concept: “Authority is constructed and contextual” and can relate to "Research as Inquiry" or "Information as Value" as well, if economic factors related to the press and clickbait websites are discussed. The concept of a source being on a spectrum of “complex vs. clickbait” adds an additional layer of complexity for students who are used to focusing on binaries such as: liberal vs. conservative or “trustworthy vs. fake.” The details of how to implement this activity as well as copies of Otero's chart are attached. (P.S. An updated version of the chart was created in Fall 2017 adding more nuance along the "complexity" axis and removing some of the "PG-13" or "sassy" language. See attached PDFs).
Contributor: Darcy Gervasio
Discipline(s): InterdisciplinaryOther
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA