Blog Post

A guide to helping student know how to use (or not to use!) the different kinds of information they may find.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as ProcessScholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA
This resource introduces students to rubrics for evaluating information, including SCARAB, CRAAP, and Reuters Source Guide. Furthermore, it provides a framework of questions to ask about a piece of information under consideration. 
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This example of an article summary, as one might find in a literature review of annotated bibliography,  enumerates the steps to ethically and accurately complete a typical research task.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog PostLearning Object
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as ProcessScholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Multidisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This libguide will help students distinguoish between primary, secondary, and tertiary sources. It includes examples and links to other libraries that provide clear instruction on the matter.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog PostLearning Object
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
Because most research tasks are complex, they require more than one search strategy. Additionally, such tasks require students to organize and synthesize the results of those searchers into one cohesive document.  This handout intends to introduce students to that process.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog PostLearning Object
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This handout informs students about the life cycle of information, directing them where to look based on when the even under research happened.  Additionally, a sample research plan is presented.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as ConversationSearching as Strategic Exploration
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
This reading provides a broad overview of the topic of "fake news" and discusses the inherent difficulty of "fixing" the problem.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog PostLearning Object
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This is a guest post at ACRLog.org, published on January 27, 2015, in which I reflect on the relationship between the Framework and assessment of student learning in and through our information literacy programs, as well as how this relates to the eventual rescission of the Information Literacy Competency Standards (formally rescinded a year and a half later on June 25, 2016). Note that the timing of the post was about a week before the ACRL Board of Directors moved to 'file' the Framework (on February 2, 2015); a year later the Framework was formally adopted by the ACRL Board on January 11, 2016. Though the post is almost two years old (as of this writing), the ideas in it may prove valuable to those seeking to integrate the Framework into their local curricula through the cyclical program review process that all curricula undergo. 
Contributor: Donna Witek
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
These are materials from a presentation I gave called Flexible Frames for Pedagogical Practice: Using the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education on May 28, 2015, at the Lehigh Valley Chapter of the Pennsylvania Library Association's 2015 Spring Conference. Materials include a blog post from my personal-professional blog, Information Constellation, that provides my slides, notes, reflection, and bibliography; a link to the slides on SlideShare; and the the slides themselves as downloadable files; note that the .pptx file is both editable and includes my presentation notes. The presentation includes a classroom example in which I used the Framework to develop instruction in a First-Year Writing course. Materials are licensed CC-BY-NC.
Contributor: Donna Witek
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Type of Institution: CollegeUniversity
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC