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This group activity is conceived of as part of a larger session about finding academic books and articles. It is an opportunity to address emerging AI tools like Elicit and the various chatbots. The jigsaw design assigns each group one tool to evaluate and present to the rest of the class.
Contributor: Megan Fitzgibbons
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Searching as Strategic Exploration
This handout on business resources was designed in collaboration with the Ciocca Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation. Although the quips aren't exactly witty, the aim of each remark is to answer the simple question: Why would I use this resource anyway? Even though the handout is created with a specific audience in mind, the quips could be used to highlight any of these resources, anywhere information is needed.
Contributor: Benjamin Hall
Resource Type(s): Other
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual, Information Has Value
This exercise scaffolds Google and Library resources in order to help students prepare for "career conversations" with industry professionals. The presentation is designed for a business communication class in which students conduct industry research as prepartion for a strategic professional networking assignment. The assumption exercise is designed explicitly to encourage students to question their assumptions about librarians and other career professionals. Padlet is used to encourage group work and for assessment purposes.
Contributor: Benjamin Hall
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
How do you detmerine whether your research has had an impact? This lesson plan covers journal and author metrics such as Journal Impact Factors, H-index, citation counts, and altmetrics. After a mini-lecture of the definitions of these metrics and how to find them using Journal Citation Reports and Google Scholar Metrics, students create a researcher profile to position themselves as scholars. Supplies needed: Printed researcher profile handouts.This activity takes approxiately 30 minutes.  Directions: Identify a university or research center you’d want to be affiliated with,...
Contributor: Tessa Withorn
Resource Type(s): Activity
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has Value
This sex-positive privacy literacy workshop engages participants in exploring how sex tech impacts intimate privacy and intimate relationships. Workshop content is contextualized with the theoretical frameworks of artificial intimacies (Brooks) and consentful tech (The Consentful Tech Project) and the concept of intimate privacy (Citron) and presented through a privacy literacy lens. Participants will identify artificial intimacies in order to assess real-world examples and their impact upon intimate privacy; evaluate the privacy of digital bodies under conditions of data promiscuity using a...
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has Value
ChatGPT is an generative artificial intelligence chatbot released in November 2022 by OpenAI. What are the opportunities in using this tool to teach library instruction? This document highlights various ways to engage with learners in critically analyzing ChatGPT (version GPT-3) and its responses through the ACRL Frame: Information Creation as a Process. 
Contributor: Ray Pun
Resource Type(s): Activity, Lesson Plan
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as Process
This learning module will help students find and critically evaluate online sources for class discussions and assignments and form unbiased judgments and decisions. What is it?A five-part series learning module that takes 1.5 - 2 hrs. to completeA 4-step strategy for evaluating online sources with hands-on exercises and an infographic guideHow will it help students succeed?Develop critical source evaluation strategies.Learn to read laterally, to evaluate and track evidenceCultivate metacognitive skills and reflective practiceBuild confidence in navigating complex online information...
Contributor: Grace Liu
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
This infographic displays where to look for information and where to search for finding public company information.
Contributor: Grace Liu
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Searching as Strategic Exploration
Beginning college students often make assumptions that scholarly sources are inherently bias-free. Students may also hold the belief that if they find a source through a library database, it is automatically a useful and neutral viewpoint on a topic. These mindsets can limit students’ motivation to apply evaluation strategies beyond establishing credibility based on the author’s credentials.This lesson plan introduces the concept of positionality statements to help students understand that scholars do not leave their identities and life experiences behind when they conduct research. Students...
Contributor: Lauren Wallis
Resource Type(s): Activity, Lesson Plan
The goal of this activity is to help students develop a broader understanding how authority is determined and what types of sources are considered appropriate in different contexts. It is also intended to help address some of the misconceptions that students have related to the source evaluation process. 
Contributor: Jane Hammons
Resource Type(s): Activity
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual

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