Not Discipline Specific

An interactive tutorial that helps students learn what scholarly articles are, how to find them, and how to read them using the "Scholarship as Conversation" frame as a lens.
Contributor: Allison Hosier
Resource Type(s): Tutorial
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
The Un-Research Project was created and implemented by Allison Hosier as part of a credit-bearing information literacy course in 2014. The project, a twist on the traditional annotated bibliography, and its connections to themes from the ACRL Framework were detailed in an article published in Communications in Information Literacy in 2015.This resource includes a list of materials associated with the project that can be adapted for use for anyone interested in implementing the un-research project or a similar one as part of their instruction.
Contributor: Allison Hosier
Resource Type(s): Assignment Prompt
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as Conversation
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
Students who write essays on research topics in which no outside sources are cited and accuracy is treated as negotiable generally should not expect to receive good grades, especially in an information literacy course. However, asking students to do just this was the first step in the “un-research project,” a twist on the familiar annotated bibliography assignment that was intended to guide students away from “satisficing” with their choice of sources and toward a better understanding of scholarship as a conversation. The project was implemented as part of a credit-bearing course in spring 2014 with promising results, including a more thoughtful choice of sources on students’ part. With some fine-tuning, the un-research project can offer an effective alternative to the traditional annotated bibliography assignment and can be adapted for a variety of instructional situations.
Contributor: Allison Hosier
Resource Type(s): Publication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as ConversationFramework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
A rubric which may be used to assess literacies based on the concepts in the ACRL Framework
Contributor: Shehaamah Mohamed
Resource Type(s): Assessment Material
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
College & Research Libraries News article about using the Framework to make sense of local curricula as they relate to information literacy goals and outcomes. Also discusses the Framework in light of "developmental outcomes," i.e., outcomes that are sequenced within a curriculum. 
Contributor: Donna Witek
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC
Information Fallout is a narrative-based learning tool designed to introduce information literacy skills to students. It is based around attaining and using six “Info Tactics” that align to the six Framework concepts. Information Fallout is meant to introduce these information literacy concepts to students. Librarians and other educators should pair the game with further discussion or lessons or assignments to more fully articulate the details of the framework skills.The site's About page lists learning objectives and includes lesson plan ideas to incorporate the game into instruction.
Contributor: Matt Lee
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This lesson plan template incorporates the ACRL Framework into the lesson planning workflow. Librarians identify which frame(s) the class will be covering prior to the creation of learning outcomes and activities. Assessment and reflection pieces are also included.
Contributor: Karleigh Knorr
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
An interdisciplinary group of faculty at Phoenix College revised the CSU-Chico CRAAP Test to include elements of the Framework.  While some of the changes are subtle, there is now an additional "P" for Process.
Contributor: Ann Roselle
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
"Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe, Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, shares her views about the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. She believes that that the Framework is one among many documents adopted by the Association of College and Research Libraries that academic librarians can and should use to promote information literacy. This interview was conducted in May 2016."
Contributor: Lisa Hinchliffe
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
Locally developed learning outcomes inspired by the framework and our institutional learning outcomes. These outcomes are the results of library-wide discussions and are scaffolded from orientation through the major. (Live link is recommended over the PDF)
Resource Type(s): Learning Outcomes List
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Pages