news media

This reading provides a broad overview of the topic of "fake news" and discusses the inherent difficulty of "fixing" the problem.
Contributor: Todd Heldt
Resource Type(s): Blog PostLearning Object
Discipline(s): Interdisciplinary
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved
This hands-on activity was piloted as part of a teach-in on fake news at Purchase College, SUNY. To convey the idea that “fake news” exists on a continuum, we did a pin-the-tail-on-the-donkey activity using a blank version of Vanessa Otero’s "Media Bias" chart. The chart is a useful tool for showing the nuances between nonfactual, biased, and inflammatory news sources. Participants are asked to research a news media organization and decide where to place it on the chart, then compare their choices to Otero's original infographic. The ensuing discussion fits nicely with the ACRL Threshold Concept: “Authority is constructed and contextual” and can relate to "Research as Inquiry" or "Information as Value" as well, if economic factors related to the press and clickbait websites are discussed. The concept of a source being on a spectrum of “complex vs. clickbait” adds an additional layer of complexity for students who are used to focusing on binaries such as: liberal vs. conservative or “trustworthy vs. fake.” The details of how to implement this activity as well as copies of Otero's chart are attached.
Contributor: Darcy Gervasio
Discipline(s): InterdisciplinaryOther
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA