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This infographic helps students figure out more information about peer-reviewed articles, including types of secondary articles like meta-analysis and meta-synethesis.  This map gives more information and helps to point them in the right direction, especially those doing literature reviews in the sciences.  
Contributor: Samantha Kennedy
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Similar to my general "research snake" this one is specficially for history student searching for history resources, primary and secondary.  This is a visual resource you can use to show students how to start research and the steps they should follow along the way.  If you have any questions, please feel free to email me at samkennedy@gmail.com
Contributor: Samantha Kennedy
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Developed for the University of Connecticut's "Research Now!" online curriculum. This worksheet is designed as a tool for students to assess their sources, and re-evaluate their research focus.
Contributor: Donovan Reinwald
Resource Type(s): Worksheet
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Creation as Process, Research as Inquiry
Developed for the University of Connecticut's "Research Now!" online curriculum. This worksheet is a tool for students to take notes about the sources they find. Based in Carol Kuhlthau's Information Search Process.
Contributor: Donovan Reinwald
Resource Type(s): Worksheet
Developed for the University of Connecticut's "Research Now!" online curriculum. This worksheet is designed as a tool to narrow a student's topic in order to write a refined research question.
Contributor: Donovan Reinwald
Resource Type(s): Worksheet
Developed for the University of Connecticut's "Research Now!" online curriculum. This activity is designed to provoke critical thinking about information sources throughout the research process. Students begin by recalling any prior knowledge of the subject, then consider what they would like to learn about it during their research. The activity then prompts them to consider how they will find information on their topic, and finally to describe what they have learned about it having completed their research.
Contributor: Donovan Reinwald
Resource Type(s): Activity
Developed for the University of Connecticut's "Research Now!" online curriculum. This worksheet is designed to work as a "Think, Pair, Share" exercise. Students begin by writing their research question, break their research question into concepts, come up with keywords, and brainstorm with a peer.
Contributor: Donovan Reinwald
Resource Type(s): Worksheet
This is a visual resource you can use to show students how to start research and the steps they should follow along the way.  This is applicable to all discplines.  If you have any questions, please feel free to email me at samkennedy@gmail.com
Contributor: Samantha Kennedy
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Developed for the University of Connecticut's "Research Now!" online curriculum. This research log is designed as a general-level tool for any class with a research component, and to be modified for specific classes. 
Contributor: Donovan Reinwald
Resource Type(s): Worksheet
This lesson starts with a simple question: "Who knows the most about (topic of your choice)?" In my experience doing this lesson with first year students, a majority of students will identify personal experience as knowing the "most" at the outset. It is common for them to say something along the lines of: No one understands what it’s like to be homeless more than someone who has been through it. Starting from that firm conviction, this lesson is designed to help students think about different ways of “knowing” and what secondary sources (particularly scholarly) are able to accomplish in...
Contributor: Jennifer Hasse
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan

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