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An infographic handout on coginitive bias in information practices. Examples include confirmation bias, availability bias, and authority bias. 
Contributor: Tessa Withorn
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Tags: bias
Presentation for the September 2017 Library Learning Services Retreat. This presentation was developed as part of the Information Fluency Initiative in the 2015-2018 UNT Libraries Strategic Plan and examines of core concepts of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education frame "Authority is Constructed and Contextual."
Contributor: Brea Henson
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Presentation for the September 2017 Subject Liaisons meeting. This presentation was developed as part of the Information Fluency Initiative in the 2015-2018 UNT Libraries Strategic Plan and contains strategies for adapting the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education frame "Authority is Constructed and Contextual" for library instruction and contains an examining of its core concepts.
Contributor: Brea Henson
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Rubric used to score student annotated bibliographies in order to evaluate the learning outcomes "Students will be able to evaluate sources based on information need and the context in which the information will be used" and "Students will be able to identify multiple perspectives on a research topic."
Contributor: Kim Pittman
Resource Type(s): Assessment Material, Rubric
In this workshop, students learn about the driving forces behind fake news, reflect on how our opinions impact the way we evaluate information, and discuss and practice using criteria for evaluating news. The workshop includes a brief presentation on fake news and cognitive biases, reflection prompts for students to respond to, and an activity in which students work in groups to evaluate different news articles on a common topic.
Contributor: Kim Pittman
Resource Type(s): Activity, Lesson Plan, Worksheet
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
The goal of this in-class activity is to help students relate database searching to something they already have familiarity with. This is interdisciplinary and could be adapted for any subject or database. Students will explore a timely topic on Twitter using a hashtag and note bias, tone, authority, and related hashtags before conducting a similar search on a library database or discovery tool. Students and instructors then discuss similarities and differences between both searches and their results. 
Contributor: Bria Sinnott
Resource Type(s): Activity, Worksheet
An open access MOOC in French to bonify the information literacy skills of university students (with Moodle).
Contributor: Pascal Martinolli
Tags: MOOC
This lesson is designed to orient teacher education students to the library spaces and resources that support the development of multiple literacies by using a gamified tour through a series of stations throughout the library. Exploration stations are focused on themes of Indigenous perspectives and critical literacy, differentiated reading materials, leisure reading, coding and computational thinking resources, and “making” stories through unplugged STEAM activities. At each station, students engage with the resources through conversation, play, and decision-making. Students will gain an...
Contributor: Wendy Traas
Resource Type(s): Activity, Lesson Plan
In this activity, students work in groups to craft a response to a presidential tweet from an assigned perspective (e.g. right or left leaning news source). In doing so, they are required to find, evaluate, and effectively use information to make a case. Unlike a research paper, which aspires to be neutral or unbiased, this activity asks students to respond to a tweet from a particular perspective, with a particular bias, requiring them to engage with their sources in a new way. The activity is followed by a discussion of students' interactions with the information they found and presented....
Contributor: Faith Rusk
Resource Type(s): Activity, Assignment Prompt
This lesson plan uses Kevin Seeber's process cards and our newly created set of process cards that focus on news sources.  In the activities using the process cards, our students were able to define and contextualize different types of information resources, including news sources.  The tranfer and apply assessment used to close the session provides an opportunity for the students to think about how they would integrate these types of information into coursework, the workplace, and their personal lives.
Contributor: Susan Miller

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