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This workshop engages academic librarians and higher education professionals in considering the implications of Dx (digital transformation) for privacy, especially intellectual privacy, in higher education. The session is designed to reveal how student, faculty, and staff data and metadata are collected, along with the potential implications of such data collection. Participants assess how this data is used in order to make informed, intentional choices to safeguard student and employee privacy. The session includes a guided close-reading activity to critically examine educational technology...
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has Value, Research as Inquiry
This workshop introduces intellectual privacy and related concepts for academic librarians and higher education professionals. The session is designed to explore the interrelationship between intellectual privacy, surveillance, the chilling effect, open inquiry, and free expression. In lieu of a prescriptive approach, participants analyze readings, case studies, and the Social Cooling infographic to consider how surveillance within the academy and society at-large can impact inquiry and expression. Privacy, the chilling effect, FERPA, and the implications of data capture and surveillance in...
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has Value, Research as Inquiry
This workshop delivers an action-oriented introduction to personal data privacy for academic librarians and higher education professionals. The session is designed to reveal the professional and educational technology systems in place to collect and analyze online behavioral data, and to unveil the real-world consequences of online profiling in contexts like academic integrity surveillance, student surveillance, and public health (COVID-19). In lieu of a prescriptive approach, participants analyze case studies to observe how online behaviors impact real-world opportunities and reflect on the...
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has Value
These slides accompany the book chapter “Revelatory Reading: Understanding, Critiquing and Unveiling Religious News Stories” from Teaching About Fake News published by ACRL.
Contributor: Andy Newgren
Resource Type(s): Slide Deck
Tags: #fakenews
This resource is designed to accompany "Chapter 23:  Faculty Conversations:  Bringing the Next Level of “Fake News” Library Instruction into the Classroom" from the ACRL book Teaching About Fake News: Lesson Plans for Different Disciplines and Audiences. Description:  The librarian will lead the faculty member(s) through a conversation/discussion that will identify and prioritize the critical thinking skills necessary to evaluate fake news in a library instruction session.  During the conversation, the librarian will advocate for the librarian’s role as an educator in...
Contributor: Jo Oehrli
Resource Type(s): Other
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Tags: #fakenews
These slides are designed to accompany Chapter 16: "Sound Science or Fake News?: Evaluating and Interpreting Scientific Sources Using the ACRL Framework" by Anna Mary Williford and Charlotte Ford, from the ACRL book Teaching About Fake News: Lesson Plans for Different Disciplines and Audiences.
Contributor: Anna Mary Williford
Resource Type(s): Activity, Lesson Plan, Slide Deck
Tags: #fakenews
Use this slidedeck to explore, identify rheotrical trends, and critically analyze and evaluate different examples of conpsiracy theories with students. This activity is part of the Teaching About Fake News volume, published by ALA.
Contributor: Sarah Morris
Resource Type(s): Slide Deck
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Tags: #fakenews
These slides are designed to accompany the book chapter, "Evaluating Data Visualizations for Misinformation & Disinformation," by Nicole Helregel, within the ACRL book Teaching About Fake News. 
Contributor: Nicole Helregel
Resource Type(s): Slide Deck
Tags: #fakenews
Academic research articles have a structure and language that is different from our other reading materials such as textbooks. This lesson can help students new to academic research understand these differences and learn strategies for finding information in such articles.
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Searching as Strategic Exploration
A learning activity PowerPoint about appropriation or re-use of art history images to create memes, and how knowledge about the original artwork in context can provide a deeper understanding of the people and society that created the work.
Contributor: Rebecca Barham
Tags: #fakenews

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