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Use this slidedeck to explore, identify rheotrical trends, and critically analyze and evaluate different examples of conpsiracy theories with students. This activity is part of the Teaching About Fake News volume, published by ALA.
Contributor: Sarah Morris
Resource Type(s): Slide Deck
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Tags: #fakenews
These slides are designed to accompany the book chapter, "Evaluating Data Visualizations for Misinformation & Disinformation," by Nicole Helregel, within the ACRL book Teaching About Fake News. 
Contributor: Nicole Helregel
Resource Type(s): Slide Deck
Tags: #fakenews
Academic research articles have a structure and language that is different from our other reading materials such as textbooks. This lesson can help students new to academic research understand these differences and learn strategies for finding information in such articles.
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Searching as Strategic Exploration
A learning activity PowerPoint about appropriation or re-use of art history images to create memes, and how knowledge about the original artwork in context can provide a deeper understanding of the people and society that created the work.
Contributor: Rebecca Barham
Tags: #fakenews
Upon studying the mixed history between photographic documentation and photographic reality, students will create their own meme.
Contributor: Amy Kim
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Tags: #fakenews
PowerPoint that accompanies Chapter 21: Teaching Students to Analyze and Interpret Historical Propaganda by Amy E. Bush, Christine Cheng, University of California, Davis, and Alesia M. McManus, University of California, Davis.
Contributor: Christine Cheng
Resource Type(s): Slide Deck
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Tags: #fakenews
A slide presentation to accompany the learning activity from the chapter "Senior Citizens, Digital Citizens: Improving Information Consumption in Older Adults" in Teaching about Fake News: Lesson Plans for Different Disciplines and Audiences. This lesson demonstrates some of the most common types of misinformation senior citizens may encounter using social media and evaluation techniques to prevent sharing with others. 
Contributor: Nicole Thomas
Resource Type(s): Slide Deck
Tags: #fakenews
These slides are designed to accompany "Countering Fake News with Collaborative Learning: Engaging Writing Center Tutors in Information Literacy Instruction, a chapter in the ACRL book Teaching About Fake News. 
Contributor: Lori Jacobson
Resource Type(s): Slide Deck
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as Conversation, Searching as Strategic Exploration
Tags: #fakenews
These materials were created to complement the "Bot or Not?" learning activity described in "Chapter 12: Fact-Checking Viral Trends for News Writers," in Teaching About Fake News: Lesson Plans for Different Disciplines and Audiences (2021). Students are to divide into groups, take a tweet provided by the instructor (samples are included in the link), and use evaluative methods introduced in the session to determine the veracity and newsworthiness of both the Twitter account and the tweet itself.
Contributor: Elizabeth Downey
Resource Type(s): Slide Deck
Tags: #fakenews
Slide deck for chapter "Establishing the Fake News-Pseudoscience Connection in a Workshop for Graduate Students" 
Contributor: Brian Quinn
Resource Type(s): Slide Deck
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Tags: #fakenews

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