Linked courses

The MLA has developed an online course to teach students how to use the MLA International Bibliography for college-level research. Each of the five units in the course presents a lesson, followed by progression questions to reinforce the lesson through active engagement with the bibliography, and a quiz.  Students will receive a badge upon passing each quiz and a course-completion badge after completing all the lessons and passing all five quizzes.The course usually takes students ninety minutes or less to complete and requires that they have access to the MLA International Bibliography on the EBSCO platform through their institution’s library. Students can create a free account to take the course and start earning badges.In January 2018, the MLA launched four new subject area modules to accompany its online course Understanding the MLA International Bibliography. Each module focuses on searching the bibliography for scholarly publications in one of four disciplines: folklore, linguistics, film (including television, video, and other broadcast media), and rhetoric and composition. Students who complete the new modules can earn badges in each of these four subject areas. Visit the course site to access the main course and new modules.Interested in other resources for teaching research and information literacy? Visit the Teaching Resources page on The MLA Style Center, where you’ll find lesson plans, assignments, and an instructor’s guide to integrating the online course into class curricula.
Contributor: Angela Ecklund
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Searching as Strategic Exploration
License Assigned: CC Attribution License CC-BY
This link was an experiment joining a small seminar-style class (LIBR201) with a large lecture class (A/HI271). Ten students registered for both courses. During a Writing Instruction Support retreat that both faculty attended in August 2013, they developed the linked aspect of the course by working through the overarching pedagogical theory driving this particular retreat, the idea of the “threshold concept,” which Dr. Carmen Werder has described as a “discipline-based concept that provides a transformational understanding and entrance to that discipline.” The instructors developed a threshold concept that helped to bind their courses together: “Data are not only textual but also visual and oral; there are data beyond texts.” This concept became the organizing principle for how the Link would function.
Contributor: Sylvia Tag
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as InquiryFramework as a Whole
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: All Rights Reserved