Activity

Privacy Workshop [Peer/Professional]

This workshop delivers an action-oriented introduction to personal data privacy for academic librarians and higher education professionals. The session is designed to reveal the professional and educational technology systems in place to collect and analyze online behavioral data, and to unveil the real-world consequences of online profiling in contexts like academic integrity surveillance, student surveillance, and public health (COVID-19). In lieu of a prescriptive approach, participants analyze case studies to observe how online behaviors impact real-world opportunities and reflect on the benefits and risks of technology use to develop purposeful online behaviors and habits that align with their individual values. Developing knowledge practices regarding privacy and the commodification of personal information and embodying the core library values of privacy and intellectual freedom, the workshop promotes a proactive rather than reactive approach and presents a spectrum of privacy preferences across a range of contexts in order to respect participants’ autonomy and agency in personal technology use. Adapted from the student-facing Privacy Workshop.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Sound Science or Fake News? Evaluating and Interpreting Scientific Sources

These slides are designed to accompany Chapter 16: "Sound Science or Fake News?: Evaluating and Interpreting Scientific Sources Using the ACRL Framework" by Anna Mary Williford and Charlotte Ford, from the ACRL book Teaching About Fake News: Lesson Plans for Different Disciplines and Audiences.
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-ShareAlike License CC-BY-SA

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Reading Scientific Research

Academic research articles have a structure and language that is different from our other reading materials such as textbooks. This lesson can help students new to academic research understand these differences and learn strategies for finding information in such articles.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Art History Memes: a good laugh for the inner critic and a lesson on appropriation

A learning activity PowerPoint about appropriation or re-use of art history images to create memes, and how knowledge about the original artwork in context can provide a deeper understanding of the people and society that created the work.
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution License CC-BY

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Tracing the Scholarly Conversation

This assignment or activity is intended to help students learn how to trace the scholarly conversation on a topic, using references and cited by tools to find previous and more recent works related to a specific source.

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Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Finding Images with the UCLA Library

This interactive comic is your introduction to finding digital images at the UCLA Library and beyond! It covers how to find image databases and online exhibits, as well as how to approach searching for and citing online images. Check out the comic’s embedded links for additional info!Learning Outcomes:Use the UCLA Library website to find and cite image resourcesExplain the difference between copyright and creative commons licensing

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Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific

Type of Institution:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Get Started with Zotero

With Zotero, you'll never have to stress again about making a properly-formatted bibliography! Zotero makes collecting, organizing, and analyzing your research sources easy. This tutorial will help you navigate the application and offer some neat tips and tricks for utilizing Zotero!Learning Outcomes:Create Zotero AccountOrganize your LibraryGenerate a bibliography in a chosen citation style (e.g. MLA, APA, Chicago, etc.)

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Using Google Scholar

Using Google Scholar to find sources for your research can yield you a lot of articles, journals, books, and more. But how do you find the right sources? Here are some tips and tricks for maximizing Google Scholar’s potential.Learning Outcomes:Adopt new strategies for improving a Google Scholar searchUse Google Scholar's Advanced SearchUse quotes in their searchUse AND, OR, NOT, and Parentheses in their search.Use Cited By and Related Articles to find relevant articlesAccess relevant articles

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Using the UCLA Digital Library

This tutorial identifies the Digital Library as a resource for supporting primary source research, and outlines how to find and access the Digital Library as well as its scope. Learning Outcomes:Understand how to access and find resources on the Digital Library website

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Turn Questions into Keywords

Improve the effectiveness of your searches by generating a variety of keywords.Learning Outcomes:Identify core concepts in research questionsList core concepts as keywordsConstruct alternative ways to express keywordsOrganize keywords into advance search fields

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

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