Research as Inquiry

Crafting a Research Question

Coming up with a good research question is essential for any research! Whether you're joining a faculty-led group or initiating an independent research project, research questions will be central to your work.By the end of this activity, you'll be able to:Generate potential research questionsRefine and improve your research questionsExplain the broader significance of your research questionIf you are joining a faculty-led project, you can still benefit from working through this tutorial. Learning about the process of generating a research question can prepare you for your future independent projects. This workshop was created by UCLA's WI+RE team.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Finding a Research Mentor or Project

Once you've decided to do research, the next step is to make a list of research opportunities that interest you!By the end of this activity, you'll be able to:Identify your research interestsIdentify potential mentors and research projectsMake a list of potential mentors and research projectsThis workshop was created by UCLA's WI+RE team.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Beginning Your Research Journey

Anyone can get started with research—all it takes is curiosity and persistence!By the end of this activity, you'll be able to:Describe the nature of researchList reasons to do researchArticulate your goals for doing researchThis workshop was created by UCLA's WI+RE team.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Getting Started with Research at UCLA

Looking to get involved with research at UCLA? Anyone can do research, and this workshop connects you with resources and opportunities to help you get started today!In this activity, you will learn about getting started with research at UCLA. By the end of this workshop, you'll be able to:Identify possible areas of interest for a research projectFind campus resources that match your needs and interestsCreate a concrete plan with the first steps for getting involved in research
Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Evaluating Research Questions Rubric

Rubric used to assess student topic proposals in order to evaluate the learning outcome "Students will formulate research questions that are appropriately scaled, facilitate inquiry, and can be supported by available resources." 

Resource Type(s):

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

Developing Research Questions and Creating Keywords

In this interactive online workshop, you will learn strategies for generating research questions and turning those questions into keywords. Coming up with keywords will help you craft more effective searches!By the end of this workshop, you'll be able to:Develop specific research questions from a topicTurn questions into keywordsConstruct a preliminary search for your specific research questionThe workshop includes interactive videos and self-assessment questions.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

Writing a Literature Review

Writing a literature review can seem like a daunting task. It involves finding sources, synthesizing them, and relating them to your research topic. This workshop will guide you through the process of writing a literature review, providing plenty of examples and tips along the way.By the end of this activity, you'll be able to:Recognize key components of a literature reviewIdentify a knowledge gap in previous research and express how you can address the gapOrganize sources effectively and logicallyThe workshop includes interactive video animations and self-assessment questions.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

The C.R.E.A.T.E.S. website

Created in collaboration with Dr. Jordan Moberg Parker, UCLA's Director of Undergraduate Laboratory Curriculum and Assessment in Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, C.R.E.A.T.E.S. is a set of 6 steps that help learners read and critically analyze scientific papers. The C.R.E.A.T.E.S. method, pioneered by Dr. Sally Hoskins, has a demonstrated positive impact on undergraduate students' self-confidence in scientific reading, as well as in their general perceptions of and beliefs about science and scientific thinking (Hoskins, et. al, 2017).The new C.R.E.A.T.E.S. site uses interactive media, step-by-step directions, and detailed annotation of authentic examples to guide students through the process.

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

"Research as Inquiry" for Senior Seminar Class In International Relations

This is a handout I shared with students in a senior seminar class. I introduced students to the concept "Research as Inquiry" and showed them different things they could do that are part of this frame. The handout helped me introduce topics I had not included in instruction work before. Many students in the class visited me during a research consultation and I felt like they were better prepared for that meeting .

Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed:

Discipline(s): 
Political Science

Type of Institution:

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution License CC-BY

Tags:

Twitter Tag

The goal of this in-class activity is to help students relate database searching to something they already have familiarity with. This is interdisciplinary and could be adapted for any subject or database. Students will explore a timely topic on Twitter using a hashtag and note bias, tone, authority, and related hashtags before conducting a similar search on a library database or discovery tool. Students and instructors then discuss similarities and differences between both searches and their results. 

Resource Type(s):

License Assigned: 
CC Attribution License CC-BY

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