Framework as a Whole

Teaching the Frameworks for Writing and Information Literacy: A Case Study from the Health Sciences

This chapter from Rewired: Research-Writing Partnerships within the Frameworks focuses on the formalized and explicit instructor-librarian collaboration in a specialized section of technical writing, and how that partnership initiated curricular and pedagogical changes that brought the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and The Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing to the forefront of course design.

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A Melting Pot of Fondue: Embedding a Librarian into an FYE Course

This recipe from The First-Year Experience Cookbook, edited by Raymond Pun and Meggan Houlihan and written by Kyrille Goldbeck DeBose, is a set of lesson plans originally designed for a First-Year Experience (FYE) course taught to familiarize students with several concepts across the Framework and create a foundational knowledge base to be built upon throughout their academic careers.

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Information Literacy Assessment under the Framework

This resource is an online guide to developing and assessing student learning outcomes based on the Framework.  The guide includes:A document mapping the Standards to the Framework.A brief discussion of assessment.An introduction to each frame.Sample outcomes for multiple choice questions, with example questions.Sample outcomes for short assignments, with examples of potential assignments.Sample outcomes for research assignments, with sample rubrics.A select annotated bibliography.

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Not Discipline Specific
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CC Attribution License CC-BY

Teaching Information Literacy Through "Un-Research"

Students who write essays on research topics in which no outside sources are cited and accuracy is treated as negotiable generally should not expect to receive good grades, especially in an information literacy course. However, asking students to do just this was the first step in the “un-research project,” a twist on the familiar annotated bibliography assignment that was intended to guide students away from “satisficing” with their choice of sources and toward a better understanding of scholarship as a conversation. The project was implemented as part of a credit-bearing course in spring 2014 with promising results, including a more thoughtful choice of sources on students’ part. With some fine-tuning, the un-research project can offer an effective alternative to the traditional annotated bibliography assignment and can be adapted for a variety of instructional situations.

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Not Discipline Specific

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Linked General Undergraduate Courses - Library and Art History

This link was an experiment joining a small seminar-style class (LIBR201) with a large lecture class (A/HI271). Ten students registered for both courses. During a Writing Instruction Support retreat that both faculty attended in August 2013, they developed the linked aspect of the course by working through the overarching pedagogical theory driving this particular retreat, the idea of the “threshold concept,” which Dr. Carmen Werder has described as a “discipline-based concept that provides a transformational understanding and entrance to that discipline.” The instructors developed a threshold concept that helped to bind their courses together: “Data are not only textual but also visual and oral; there are data beyond texts.” This concept became the organizing principle for how the Link would function.

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21st Century Literacies and Graduate Attributes

The University of the Western Cape has developed a set of graduate attributes that are based on the UWC vision and mission. This tutorial is based on six concepts that may be used to enhance such attributes. An understanding of these concepts will mean that students develop a sense of agency in their research and practices, which opens up a pathway to lifelong learning and professional development. The concepts enable learners to become autonomous and collaborative and active contributors to knowledge. The tutorial also offers authentic examples which may be used to illustrate ways of applying and interpreting the various concepts.

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Education

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Leveraging New Frameworks to Teach Information Appropriation

This chapter investigates the ACRL and WPA frameworks to discuss commonalities in how they approach appropriation of information in compositional contexts.  The chapter presents two sample assignments and outlines a case study of a collaboration between library and English faculty.

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CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA

If We Frame It, They Will Respond: Undergraduate Student Responses to the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education

Exploratory study in two parts.  Part one addresses the question of whether or not undergraduate students can understand the language and concepts in this document. By presenting student responses to pretest questions recorded at the beginning of a semester-long research methods course, this article shows that students can, even on first impression, begin to make sense of the complexity and richness found in the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education.  Survey questions and complete student responses are included.Part two compares student pretest and posttest responses conducted at the beginning and end of a semester-long research methods course to measure the evolution of undergraduate students’ comprehension of information literacy concepts aspresented in the Frames.

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"Becoming gardeners: Seeding local curricula with the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy"

College & Research Libraries News article about using the Framework to make sense of local curricula as they relate to information literacy goals and outcomes. Also discusses the Framework in light of "developmental outcomes," i.e., outcomes that are sequenced within a curriculum. 

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Discipline(s): 
Not Discipline Specific
License Assigned: 
CC Attribution-NonCommercial License CC-BY-NC

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