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Librarians are frequently asked to “teach” several databases in a 1-shot session, despite findings suggesting that such database demonstrations do not lead to optimal student outcomes. The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education highlights the concepts of metaliteracy and metacognition. This paper investigates ways in which I leveraged both of these concepts to reconcile my pedagogical ideals with an attempt to honor a faculty member’s request. By demonstrating question posing and making my own metacognitive processes transparent to students, I found that I could honor a faculty request for specific database demonstration while helping learners comprehend and see beyond the constructs of platform and format.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discipline(s): MultidisciplinaryMusic
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License CC-BY-NC-ND
Although much of the classical music repertory is centuries old, musicians and musicologists participate in ongoing and lively conversations about the works. New insights on old works increasingly surface thanks to technological innovations: from data-rich digital humanities projects to casual online forums where media and text can be posted and discussed. The study and performance of a musical work--even more so than text-based disciplines--should be informed by a variety of sources in a wide array of formats. As the interplay between audience and performer becomes increasingly dynamic and the potential sources for study multiply, librarians can help students negotiate this sustained, multi-format discourse. Unlike other disciplines in which there may be an uncontested answer, a musical work is subject to interpretation in unique ways. “Scholarship as Conversation” provides a framework with which musicians might begin to navigate the many considerations of how to perform or understand a piece. In order to fully appreciate the lifecycle of the work, for example, once must synthesize a variety of contemporary and historical recordings, scholarly, manuscript, and performing scores, composer biography, and other contextual information. Academic librarians must partner with music faculty to offer instruction that specifically targets and assesses student understanding of the dialogic nature of music performance and study. By helping musicians understand the many voices engaged in this dialogue, such collaborations could make a meaningful impact on the musician’s stock-in-trade: her performance.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License CC-BY-NC-ND
University of North Texas Libraries' Library Literacy Escape Room Student Learning Outcomes as tied to ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education.Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) created in planning stages of the UNT Libraries Escape the Library escape room created for UNT First Flight (freshman orientation).  
Contributor: Greg Hardin
Resource Type(s): Learning Outcomes List
Discipline(s): Not Discipline Specific
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
The Evidenced-Based Practice lesson is mapped to the Research as Inquiry Frame and addresses how to match a clinical question to types of research evidence.
Contributor: Joelle Pitts
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as Inquiry
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA
As part of a collaboration with Claire Holmes and Lisa Sweeney at Towson University's Albert S. Cook Library, I infused our lesson plan for ISTC 301/501 with ACRL Framework Concepts. The original lesson plan was conceived of by Holmes and Sweeney as a way to integreate information literacy instruction concepts for teachers into ISTC 301 and SPED 413 in our College of Education. The attached slides illustrate one way to include information literacy instruction, the ACRL Framework, and teaching standards in college-level instruction. The aim for this lesson plan was to encourage College of Education students to include information literacy instruction in their lesson plans at the k-12 level so that students matriculating from their schools would be familiar with these crucial theories before arriving in higher education or the workplace.The lesson was structured as follows:Introduce digital citizenship and information literacy conceptsModel lesson planning using library resourcesCreate lesson plans using Common Core State StandardsStudents were encouraged to reflect on their own experiences as researchers, apply their learned research skills to their k-12 classrooms, use library resources to enhance their lesson plan creation, create a lesson plan in smaller groups to share with the classroom, incorporate lexile levels from multiple grade levels, and use open-source lesson plan materials focused on information literacy.Discussions about "Scholarship as a Conversation" and "Searching as Strategic Exploration" were included to highlight the importance of authority and of using sources from a variety of locations. 
Contributor: Sarah Gilchrist
Resource Type(s): Lesson Plan
Discipline(s): Education
Type of Institution: University
License Assigned: CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License CC-BY-NC-SA