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This is a lesson plan, files, and assessment information for an upper level biology class.  It is in two parts, finding genetic information online and citing images.  It follows a flipped model with pre-class activities required.  The second activity on citing images was created using a Process Orientated Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) framework.  Although this activity is specific to CSE style, the activity could be adapted to any citation style.  
Contributor: Michelle Price
A rubric which may be used to assess literacies based on the concepts in the ACRL Framework
Contributor: Shehaamah Mohamed
Resource Type(s): Assessment Material
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
The University of the Western Cape has developed a set of graduate attributes that are based on the UWC vision and mission. This tutorial is based on six concepts that may be used to enhance such attributes. An understanding of these concepts will mean that students develop a sense of agency in their research and practices, which opens up a pathway to lifelong learning and professional development. The concepts enable learners to become autonomous and collaborative and active contributors to knowledge. The tutorial also offers authentic examples which may be used to illustrate ways of...
Contributor: Shehaamah Mohamed
Resource Type(s): Tutorial
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Discovery tools are great at revealing the variety of sources available to researchers. This one-shot lesson plan makes use of discovery platform facets and features to show students the range of content available. Students will also explore and evaluate how the available information sources differ from each other. The lesson may be more appropriate for upper-level students who have database experience and a basic understanding of what research looks like within their disciplines.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
This chapter investigates the ACRL and WPA frameworks to discuss commonalities in how they approach appropriation of information in compositional contexts.  The chapter presents two sample assignments and outlines a case study of a collaboration between library and English faculty.
Contributor: Rachel Scott
Resource Type(s): Assignment Prompt, Publication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Scholarship as Conversation, Framework as a Whole
Exploratory study in two parts.  Part one addresses the question of whether or not undergraduate students can understand the language and concepts in this document. By presenting student responses to pretest questions recorded at the beginning of a semester-long research methods course, this article shows that students can, even on first impression, begin to make sense of the complexity and richness found in the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education.  Survey questions and complete student responses are included.Part two compares student pretest and posttest...
Contributor: Rachel Scott
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
The Citations lesson is mapped to Information has Value and Scholarship as Conversation Frames. It discusses why citations are a foundation of scholarly communication and the basic components of a citation. Through infographics and videos, students will learn the differences between paraphrasing, summarizing and quoting.
Contributor: Joelle Pitts
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Information Has Value, Scholarship as Conversation
This assignment has students analyzing data presented in graphs, charts and infographics that are pre-selected by librarian and instructor based on how poorly the information is being presented through various outlets.
Contributor: Spencer Brayton
Resource Type(s): Activity
College & Research Libraries News article about using the Framework to make sense of local curricula as they relate to information literacy goals and outcomes. Also discusses the Framework in light of "developmental outcomes," i.e., outcomes that are sequenced within a curriculum. 
Contributor: Donna Witek
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Information Fallout is a narrative-based learning tool designed to introduce information literacy skills to students. It is based around attaining and using six “Info Tactics” that align to the six Framework concepts. Information Fallout is meant to introduce these information literacy concepts to students. Librarians and other educators should pair the game with further discussion or lessons or assignments to more fully articulate the details of the framework skills.The site's About page lists learning objectives and includes lesson plan ideas to incorporate the game into instruction.
Contributor: Matt Lee
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole

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