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This document includes SLOs with performance indicators. After each indicator is a rubric to explain what would be considered excellent, acceptable, developing, or confused work for each indicator. It can be used for a course or program.
Contributor: Smita Avasthi
Resource Type(s): Learning Outcomes List, Rubric
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
This rubric is based upon a set of learning outcomes for an information literacy course. Each outcome includes specific performance indicators. The rubric has 4 categories for evaluation: excellent, acceptable, developing, and confused. This rubric could also be used on the program level.
Contributor: Smita Avasthi
Resource Type(s): Rubric
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
This is a map to the current course outline for a 1-unit information literacy class to a proposed course outline that embeds all of the frames.
Contributor: Smita Avasthi
Resource Type(s): Curriculum Map
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Tags: SLOs
This is a draft of the revised course outline for a one-unit information literacy course. Due to our curriculum process, it includes broad outcomes followed by more specific performance indicators. There is also the "Topics and Scope" which specifies content more explicitly. It could also be used at the program level.
Contributor: Smita Avasthi
Resource Type(s): Learning Outcomes List
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
Tags: SLOs
This program targets students who have been identified as individuals who would benefit from enrichment and academic and social preparation for success in a university setting. The library offers a six-week, one-credit course through the Africana Studies and Latino Studies programs entitled “Research Strategies”. This course introduces students to skills needed to successfully perform academic research in a university library, focusing primarily on the ACRL Frames regarding authority, value, inquiry and strategic exploration of information
Contributor: Tony Cosgrave
Need to add an active learning exercise in your info lit workshop? Consider designing an escape room where students work in teams and compete against other while self-teaching how to conduct research. 
Contributor: Ray Pun
Resource Type(s): Activity
Four short screencasts under 90 seconds about the role of metacognition in information literacy instruction.
Contributor: Susan Ariew
Resource Type(s): Learning Object
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Research as Inquiry
In the early drafts of the Information Literacy Framework for Higher Education, metaliteracy and metacognition contributed several guiding principles in recognition of the fact that information literacy concepts need to reflect students’ roles as creators and participants in research and scholarship. The authors contend that diminution of metaliteracy and metacognition occurred during later revisions of the Framework and thus diminished the document’s usefulness as a teaching tool. This article highlights the value of metaliteracy and metacognition in order to support the argument that these...
Contributor: Susan Ariew
Resource Type(s): Publication
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Framework as a Whole
This is a lively small-group activity suitable for intro-level classes in one or two-shot sessions, but easily adaptable for use with high schoolers. The goal of the activity is to demystify information evaluation and get students to generate their own criteria by which to evaluate the reliability of information and information sources. Students will also discuss the ways in which these criteria are contextual and may vary by situation.
Contributor: Claire Lobdell
Resource Type(s): Activity, Learning Object
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual
The following activity is meant to demonstrate the concepts of authorship and authority to first year writing students. Students will use their prior knowledge and everyday experiences with subpar information to draw parallels between evaluating academic and popular sources.
Contributor: Heather Beirne
Resource Type(s): Activity, Lesson Plan
Information Literacy Frame(s) Addressed: Authority is Constructed and Contextual

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